Basin inventory development

Blog_Basininventorydevelopment.jpg

Managing community assets is an important function of any local
municipality. Often included in those assets are detention and retention
basins, which are critical for storm water regulation and erosion
control for local waterways. In order to effectively manage these local
assets, an inventory of each basin’s location, ownership, and status is
needed for maintenance and development planning. As part of the National
Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), the City of Des Plaines
conducted a full survey of all city basins using Geographic Information
System (GIS) as the primary tool for storing and analyzing the
inventory data.

Developing a basin inventory was a multi-step process and
involved the city’s Engineering, Public Works, and GIS departments.
Field checks by the city Engineers were required to gather the required
attributes, but the preliminary process of locating each basin was done
using contour data and aerial imagery to identify depressions, which
were then traced and added to the GIS system for mapping. As part of the
field checks, pictures of the basins, along with the location of the
utility structures that flow in or out of each, were captured and
integrated into the GIS data. Recently, this inventory was completed and
is now available to assist the city with the NPDES required 5 year
basin maintenance cycle.

Basin inventory development

Blog_Basininventorydevelopment.jpg

Managing community assets is an important function of any local
municipality. Often included in those assets are detention and retention
basins, which are critical for storm water regulation and erosion
control for local waterways. In order to effectively manage these local
assets, an inventory of each basin’s location, ownership, and status is
needed for maintenance and development planning. As part of the National
Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), the City of Des Plaines
conducted a full survey of all city basins using Geographic Information
System (GIS) as the primary tool for storing and analyzing the
inventory data.

Developing a basin inventory was a multi-step process and
involved the city’s Engineering, Public Works, and GIS departments.
Field checks by the city Engineers were required to gather the required
attributes, but the preliminary process of locating each basin was done
using contour data and aerial imagery to identify depressions, which
were then traced and added to the GIS system for mapping. As part of the
field checks, pictures of the basins, along with the location of the
utility structures that flow in or out of each, were captured and
integrated into the GIS data. Recently, this inventory was completed and
is now available to assist the city with the NPDES required 5 year
basin maintenance cycle.