Bringing in Public Works documents to GIS

Blog_Bringing_in_Public_Works_documents_to_GIS.png

At the heart of Geographic Information System (GIS) is the
organization and storing of data. Typically the data is a geographic
representation of a real world feature as well as a database containing
fields of information describing that feature. GIS however does allow
for an additional level of visualization besides analyzing the existing
data within the system and that is the ability to link to existing
resources that reside outside the GIS.

This technology called hyperlinking allows images, videos, and
virtually any other electronic resource to be opened by simply inquiring
further on a specific feature in the GIS. All that is required to
achieve this functionality is the data entry of the location of the
desired resource. If the existing documents have been named and
organized effectively, the data entry process can be eliminated by
associating the document names to information in the geographic
feature’s attributes. An example of this would be matching flooding
photos at a specific address to a property in the GIS for which address
information already exists e.g. 1000 Cypress Ln linked to
\2008FloodPhotos1000CypressLn.jpeg.

Linking has successfully been initiated with the Elk Grove Village
Public Works department water service images. Other potential uses for
hyperlinking in the GIS include opening scanned subdivision plats, a
website on the internet, or televised sewer videos.

The benefit of initiating these links is that the user becomes
empowered with as much information as is available in a quick and easy
interaction from a central resource. Time is saved because you can
gather information from a location perspective and no longer have to
remember which drive and in which folder that resource was placed. In
some cases users are provided extremely useful information through the
links that they otherwise would not even known existed because it was
created by another coworker or existed in another department.

Bringing in Public Works documents to GIS

Blog_Bringing_in_Public_Works_documents_to_GIS.png

At the heart of Geographic Information System (GIS) is the
organization and storing of data. Typically the data is a geographic
representation of a real world feature as well as a database containing
fields of information describing that feature. GIS however does allow
for an additional level of visualization besides analyzing the existing
data within the system and that is the ability to link to existing
resources that reside outside the GIS.

This technology called hyperlinking allows images, videos, and
virtually any other electronic resource to be opened by simply inquiring
further on a specific feature in the GIS. All that is required to
achieve this functionality is the data entry of the location of the
desired resource. If the existing documents have been named and
organized effectively, the data entry process can be eliminated by
associating the document names to information in the geographic
feature’s attributes. An example of this would be matching flooding
photos at a specific address to a property in the GIS for which address
information already exists e.g. 1000 Cypress Ln linked to
\2008FloodPhotos1000CypressLn.jpeg.

Linking has successfully been initiated with the Elk Grove Village
Public Works department water service images. Other potential uses for
hyperlinking in the GIS include opening scanned subdivision plats, a
website on the internet, or televised sewer videos.

The benefit of initiating these links is that the user becomes
empowered with as much information as is available in a quick and easy
interaction from a central resource. Time is saved because you can
gather information from a location perspective and no longer have to
remember which drive and in which folder that resource was placed. In
some cases users are provided extremely useful information through the
links that they otherwise would not even known existed because it was
created by another coworker or existed in another department.