Business inventory on the internet

​Back in the fall of 2009, a village trustee was trying to inform a
resident of the businesses available in the village of Wheeling. The
trustee was unable to find anything on the internet or the village
website in regards to the business. The trustee asked the economic
development department to put together an updated business inventory for
the new village website. In turn, economic development asked the GIS
department to create a series of maps that would accurately display the
inventory information.

Keyhole Markup Language (KML) was developed by Google for an easy way
to express geographic elements on internet-based maps such as Google
Maps and Google Earth. It was determined the best way to map out all the
businesses in Wheeling, was to use Google KML to map out each location
as a point with the familiar Google Maps as a background. Close to 900
businesses in the village were categorized as either, Industrial,
Commercial & Retail, or Food & Hospitality. By breaking the
businesses down into categories, it relieved the issue of congestion
when opening a map with close to 900 points. Each category would get its
own map so that the user would not be overwhelmed. After the businesses
were categorized, attributes such as phone number, address, and website
were added to each location allowing the user to click on a point and
see all contact information. The businesses were then mapped out and
tested before being added to the village website.

By having an updated business inventory on the village website, the
village provides information that is important to its residents. With
having each business mapped out, a resident or someone visiting the
village can find a specific business and then get all related
information by interacting with the point on the map. Business locations
maps could be created without using GIS, but it would be very
difficult. The sheer number of locations ensures that to correctly find a
location, a map would have to zoom in and out so as not to appear as
just a big collection of dots. By using GIS and Google KML, the village
was able to create an interactive map that could provide all relevant
information and be accessed by anybody who visits the village website.

Business inventory on the internet

​Back in the fall of 2009, a village trustee was trying to inform a
resident of the businesses available in the village of Wheeling. The
trustee was unable to find anything on the internet or the village
website in regards to the business. The trustee asked the economic
development department to put together an updated business inventory for
the new village website. In turn, economic development asked the GIS
department to create a series of maps that would accurately display the
inventory information.

Keyhole Markup Language (KML) was developed by Google for an easy way
to express geographic elements on internet-based maps such as Google
Maps and Google Earth. It was determined the best way to map out all the
businesses in Wheeling, was to use Google KML to map out each location
as a point with the familiar Google Maps as a background. Close to 900
businesses in the village were categorized as either, Industrial,
Commercial & Retail, or Food & Hospitality. By breaking the
businesses down into categories, it relieved the issue of congestion
when opening a map with close to 900 points. Each category would get its
own map so that the user would not be overwhelmed. After the businesses
were categorized, attributes such as phone number, address, and website
were added to each location allowing the user to click on a point and
see all contact information. The businesses were then mapped out and
tested before being added to the village website.

By having an updated business inventory on the village website, the
village provides information that is important to its residents. With
having each business mapped out, a resident or someone visiting the
village can find a specific business and then get all related
information by interacting with the point on the map. Business locations
maps could be created without using GIS, but it would be very
difficult. The sheer number of locations ensures that to correctly find a
location, a map would have to zoom in and out so as not to appear as
just a big collection of dots. By using GIS and Google KML, the village
was able to create an interactive map that could provide all relevant
information and be accessed by anybody who visits the village website.