Calculating Road Curb Replacement

Blog_CalculatingRoadCurbReplacement.png

When repaving village streets after maintenance or a repair, the
Village of Wheeling typically has to take in account the amount of curb
that has to be rebuilt or repaired. The price of the repairs depends on
the length of the curb and the different types of aprons that feed into
the street i.e. driveway, parking lot, sidewalk, etc… The engineering
department wanted to know if there was an easier way to calculate the
amount of curb length for each village owned street and get a count of
the number of aprons along the roadway as well.

Using the base map data provided by Ayres Associates, all the curbs
in the village were split by their respective roads. The amount of curb
length split by the road boundaries was added to the road data table
along with a count of any sidewalk, driveway, or parking lot that
intersected the original road data. With the data all divided and
organized, a map was created allowing an engineer to select a section of
a road and then view a table showing the length of curb for that
section and the number of aprons along the road. By using GIS, the
Village of Wheeling was able to cut down the amount of time it would
take to manually calculate curb length as well as provide a quick way to
make estimates on the cost of repaving certain streets

Calculating Road Curb Replacement

Blog_CalculatingRoadCurbReplacement.png

When repaving village streets after maintenance or a repair, the
Village of Wheeling typically has to take in account the amount of curb
that has to be rebuilt or repaired. The price of the repairs depends on
the length of the curb and the different types of aprons that feed into
the street i.e. driveway, parking lot, sidewalk, etc… The engineering
department wanted to know if there was an easier way to calculate the
amount of curb length for each village owned street and get a count of
the number of aprons along the roadway as well.

Using the base map data provided by Ayres Associates, all the curbs
in the village were split by their respective roads. The amount of curb
length split by the road boundaries was added to the road data table
along with a count of any sidewalk, driveway, or parking lot that
intersected the original road data. With the data all divided and
organized, a map was created allowing an engineer to select a section of
a road and then view a table showing the length of curb for that
section and the number of aprons along the road. By using GIS, the
Village of Wheeling was able to cut down the amount of time it would
take to manually calculate curb length as well as provide a quick way to
make estimates on the cost of repaving certain streets