Planning for the protection of open space

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The Village of Wheeling is currently preparing for the National Flood
Insurance Program Community Rating System (CRS) review. The review
takes into account various aspects of flood prevention infrastructure in
the village and ultimately decides the percentage of savings a resident
receives for flood insurance. One of the important aspects of the
review is a village’s preservation of open space within the floodplain.
By having the floodplain clear of structures and impervious surface
area, the village receives a higher score due to the lower possibility
of damage occurring.

For the village to receive credit for open space preservation, it had
to create a list of village owned properties that had areas in the
flood plain. Then, the square footage of each area within the floodplain
had to be calculated subtracting out any impervious surface area such
as roads, sidewalks, parking lots, etc… which was then compared to the
entire area of floodplain within the village. The final ratio of open
space to flood plain is then used to determine the overall score for
open space preservation.

By using GIS, the village was able to save a significant amount of
time by using base map data that already existed and floodplain areas
provided by FEMA. By using GIS to calculate the areas of open space and
impervious surface area for each property, the village did not have to
spend time going through building plans and calculating everything by
hand. The CRS review is not until later in the year, but by tackling the
Open Space Preservation section now, there will be time later to make
adjustments to the data.

Fire resource analysis

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Like many other Fire Departments, the City of Highland Park Fire
Department finds itself having to maintain current level of converage
with less resources. Determining where to effectively deploy these
resources is an important part of maintaining the expected service
level. The Fire Department approached the GIS Office about using GIS to
evaluate where to locate Department resources and it was decided to
create two series of map products.

The first map product used ESRI’s ArcView with the Network Analysis
Extension to create maps showing response times in one minute increments
from each station to the edge of the community. The response time
routes follow the road network and include impediments such as one way
streets and stop signs. The goal of these maps was to judge the impact
on response times if one of the stations were closed.

The second set of maps displayed Fire Department response data for a
period of one year. Various maps were created and categorized by type
and or time. These maps helped identify hot spots of Fire Department
responses. The goal of these maps was to analyze areas where the Fire
Department mostly frequently responded, so that resources could be
effectively deployed to respond to these areas in a timely manor.

By using GIS the Fire Department had a powerful tool to assist with
adapting to a new reality. They gained the confidence to make difficult
choices because they have the information to judge the impact of these
decisions. Thus they will be able to maintain their current service
level using fewer resources.

Fire resource analysis

Blog_Fireresourceanalysis.png

Like many other Fire Departments, the City of Highland Park Fire
Department finds itself having to maintain current level of converage
with less resources. Determining where to effectively deploy these
resources is an important part of maintaining the expected service
level. The Fire Department approached the GIS Office about using GIS to
evaluate where to locate Department resources and it was decided to
create two series of map products.

The first map product used ESRI’s ArcView with the Network Analysis
Extension to create maps showing response times in one minute increments
from each station to the edge of the community. The response time
routes follow the road network and include impediments such as one way
streets and stop signs. The goal of these maps was to judge the impact
on response times if one of the stations were closed.

The second set of maps displayed Fire Department response data for a
period of one year. Various maps were created and categorized by type
and or time. These maps helped identify hot spots of Fire Department
responses. The goal of these maps was to analyze areas where the Fire
Department mostly frequently responded, so that resources could be
effectively deployed to respond to these areas in a timely manor.

By using GIS the Fire Department had a powerful tool to assist with
adapting to a new reality. They gained the confidence to make difficult
choices because they have the information to judge the impact of these
decisions. Thus they will be able to maintain their current service
level using fewer resources.

MapOffice public deployed to Lake Forest employees and residents

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Lake Forest will have access to the web version of MapOffice™
beginning June 1st. The month of May was spent preparing the base data
needed to get MapOffice™ up and running, which involved loading previous
GIS data into the GIS Consortium standardized database.

MapOffice™ will provide staff and residents with information for each
parcel and address in the city, which ranges from school districts and
voting information to garbage pick up days. A link to the Lake County
Assessor’s website for each individual address is also provided to gain
further information regarding building and property dimensions, assessed
value, and sales history.  Tools will be available to the user to
provide further analysis if needed, such as measuring and links to both
Google Street View and Bing Maps Bird’s Eye View.

Information commonly used by staff to assist residents will now all
be available in one place, increasing efficiency, as well as providing
basic information to residents who may have otherwise had to call in to
ask about in the past. Work continues on data creation for MapOffice™
Advanced, which is scheduled to be available on the City intranet by
mid-June.

MapOffice public deployed to Lake Forest employees and residents

Blog_MapOffice_public_deployed_to_Lake_Forest.png

Lake Forest will have access to the web version of MapOffice™
beginning June 1st. The month of May was spent preparing the base data
needed to get MapOffice™ up and running, which involved loading previous
GIS data into the GIS Consortium standardized database.

MapOffice™ will provide staff and residents with information for each
parcel and address in the city, which ranges from school districts and
voting information to garbage pick up days. A link to the Lake County
Assessor’s website for each individual address is also provided to gain
further information regarding building and property dimensions, assessed
value, and sales history.  Tools will be available to the user to
provide further analysis if needed, such as measuring and links to both
Google Street View and Bing Maps Bird’s Eye View.

Information commonly used by staff to assist residents will now all
be available in one place, increasing efficiency, as well as providing
basic information to residents who may have otherwise had to call in to
ask about in the past. Work continues on data creation for MapOffice™
Advanced, which is scheduled to be available on the City intranet by
mid-June.

Public safety response

​Of all the services provided by local municipalities around the
world, public safety is arguably the most recognizable and widely
supported. Everyone wants to feel that they are safe and that someone
will respond to assist them in the case of an emergency. The Village of
Winnetka traditionally has provided fire, EMS, and police protection to
its residences since it was established, however, over the years, these
Village departments have started to provide service to additional areas
immediately outside the village boundaries through a series of public
service contracts. To assist with coordinating response efforts in these
service agreement areas, the fire and police departments asked the
village GIS department for assistance.

While several of these contracts are for police services in
unincorporated areas south of the village limits, the fire department
has the added responsibility of providing service to the Village of
Kenilworth, a small municipality located southeast of Winnetka. For
years, this area has either not been mapped or has been poorly mapped,
making it difficult to plan efficient response routes. To help resolve
these issues, the GIS department created several data layers for
Kenilworth that allow for more effective response mapping.

Since the Village of Kenilworth is not part of the GIS Consortium,
much of the base data for this area was provided by Cook County,
including roads, parcels, and an initial street address range line. The
other information used to develop this data, such as individual
addresses and street names, was provided by a combination of the
Winnetka fire and police departments. Using these two sources, a
Kenilworth street name table and an initial address database were
developed. While these two data layers do not complete the Kenilworth
dataset, they allow for additional information to be developed in the
Village database, such as a more accurate street address range feature
class.

While this service area data is being developed to assist the overall
public safety efforts of the Village of Winnetka, ultimately, the
police and fire department will use it to accomplish different goals.
For the police department, since they provide response assistance to
Kenilworth and, often, travel through the village when responding to
calls in other communities, the street address range data will be
inputted into an existing CAD (Computer Aided Dispatch) system to
provide responding officers with both village address ranges and
information on how the streets are aligned to help improve response
times. For the fire department, since they are the primary response
agency for Kenilworth, the individual resident and commercial property
addresses are critical for pinpointing the exact location of an
emergency call. A detailed map of Kenilworth, including streets, parcel
lines, and individual addresses, will be created to provide the
department with accurate property information prior to going out on a
call.

For both departments, the data developed by the GIS system will help
to improve their ability to respond more efficiently and with more
certainty regarding the location of an emergency call. This leads to
better public safety services for the Village of Kenilworth and a more
reliable system for the Village of Winnetka in responding to an
emergency event.

Public safety response

​Of all the services provided by local municipalities around the
world, public safety is arguably the most recognizable and widely
supported. Everyone wants to feel that they are safe and that someone
will respond to assist them in the case of an emergency. The Village of
Winnetka traditionally has provided fire, EMS, and police protection to
its residences since it was established, however, over the years, these
Village departments have started to provide service to additional areas
immediately outside the village boundaries through a series of public
service contracts. To assist with coordinating response efforts in these
service agreement areas, the fire and police departments asked the
village GIS department for assistance.

While several of these contracts are for police services in
unincorporated areas south of the village limits, the fire department
has the added responsibility of providing service to the Village of
Kenilworth, a small municipality located southeast of Winnetka. For
years, this area has either not been mapped or has been poorly mapped,
making it difficult to plan efficient response routes. To help resolve
these issues, the GIS department created several data layers for
Kenilworth that allow for more effective response mapping.

Since the Village of Kenilworth is not part of the GIS Consortium,
much of the base data for this area was provided by Cook County,
including roads, parcels, and an initial street address range line. The
other information used to develop this data, such as individual
addresses and street names, was provided by a combination of the
Winnetka fire and police departments. Using these two sources, a
Kenilworth street name table and an initial address database were
developed. While these two data layers do not complete the Kenilworth
dataset, they allow for additional information to be developed in the
Village database, such as a more accurate street address range feature
class.

While this service area data is being developed to assist the overall
public safety efforts of the Village of Winnetka, ultimately, the
police and fire department will use it to accomplish different goals.
For the police department, since they provide response assistance to
Kenilworth and, often, travel through the village when responding to
calls in other communities, the street address range data will be
inputted into an existing CAD (Computer Aided Dispatch) system to
provide responding officers with both village address ranges and
information on how the streets are aligned to help improve response
times. For the fire department, since they are the primary response
agency for Kenilworth, the individual resident and commercial property
addresses are critical for pinpointing the exact location of an
emergency call. A detailed map of Kenilworth, including streets, parcel
lines, and individual addresses, will be created to provide the
department with accurate property information prior to going out on a
call.

For both departments, the data developed by the GIS system will help
to improve their ability to respond more efficiently and with more
certainty regarding the location of an emergency call. This leads to
better public safety services for the Village of Kenilworth and a more
reliable system for the Village of Winnetka in responding to an
emergency event.