GIS supporting computer aided dispatch

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The Village of Wheeling Police Department, like all police
departments, uses Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) Machines to assist when
dispatching squad cars and ambulances. These systems typically come
with some sort of mapping program that shows the address of where a call
is coming from and the location of all police vehicles in the village.
Usually these maps are populated with generic regional data and don’t
contain much detail. The Village of Wheeling Police Department
requested that the base maps be updated with detailed village data
currently residing in the village’s online mapping program; MapOffice™
Advanced.

By using a combination of software installed with the CAD machines
and existing Village data, the GIS department was able to upload
improved and more accurate information for the dispatchers. Updated
information included addresses, building footprints, parking lots,
streets, daycares, and much more. This allowed the dispatchers to see
up-to-date information that is maintained locally, instead of free
regional data that may be a few years out-of-date. This also allows them
to give correct information to any officers that are dispatched to a
call, such as building locations or vehicle entrances and exits. By
using GIS, the Village of Wheeling is able to give their dispatchers and
officers updated information that is beneficial for their needs.

Storm Sewer GPS Field Data Collection

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For the past few years, the Village of Wheeling has been in the
process of updating their village utility systems and maps. The Village
has taken a proactive approach to making sure that there is a complete
and updated inventory and map system of all three utility systems:
Water, Sanitary, and Storm Sewer. The water and sanitary systems were
the first to be completed. With those out of the way, the Village then
moved on to updating the storm sewer system.

The Public Works Department has come up with a process that
ensures that they get the most accurate utility locations possible with
the equipment they have. First, the department sets up GPS control
points for whatever neighborhood they are working in. Second, the
department makes sure it captures GPS data when the weather is clear and
the most satellites are available, when using handheld GPS data
collection devices. These steps ensure that the point locations will be
as accurate as possible. After obtaining the point locations, the
Engineering Department receives the data from Public Works and begins
putting together the utility line work in AutoCAD using a combination of
as-builts, engineering diagrams, and aerial imagery. After the line
work is completed in CAD, the information is passed along to the GIS
department who then updates all the location and attribute information
using the information provided by the other departments. The data is
then added to the village’s in house mapping program, MapOffice™
Advanced, which allows village staff to view the most up-to-date utility
information on their computers and print out sections of the utility
system to bring out into the field.

By using GIS with a combination of other programs, such as
AutoCAD and GPS, the Village of Wheeling can easily and accurately
update its utility system records, therefore giving its staff the most
up-to-date information to work with.

Online business inventory

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In the past, the Village of Wheeling has kept an informal list of all
the businesses in the village using business license data. Then, using
Google KML, this information was mapped out and displayed on Google
Maps. However, the information displayed in Google Maps would quickly
become outdated and it was difficult to update. Economic Development
requested an alternate way to display village businesses online, that
would be much easier to update to reflect changes in the village.

In 2012, a new feature was created for the Village’s public mapping
program, MapOffice™. This feature allows for the creation of custom map
data that could then be displayed online for the village residents to
view. An added benefit of this feature is that the data is easily
updateable, just like other GIS data that is integrated with MapOffice™.
An updated list of all the village business licenses was created, and
they were then sorted into three different categories: Commercial, Food
& Hospitality, and Industrial. New icons were created for each
category and then the data was uploaded online. Now, Village residents
can view all the locations of businesses by scrolling through the map
and then retrieve the information about each business by clicking the
related icon. By using GIS, the Village was able to take existing
village information, and then present it in a format that is easy to use
by the public.

Interactive pavement imagery

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In 2011, The Village of Wheeling hired MDS Technologies to drive
around the village and collect data related to the village streets and
sidewalks. A few months back, the Village used Pavement Condition Index
(PCI) numbers that were part of the data delivery, to determine what
street sections in the village were in the most need of repair. Another
part of this data delivery, which was received at a later date, was as
series of images taken for each section of the Village owned road. The
Capital Projects department was interested if there was a way to
associate the images to their exact location and for them to be able to
select each location and see the corresponding images.

MDS Technologies provided the Village of Wheeling with over 100,000
GPS points, each with a link to an image using a unique ID number. All
of the points were mapped in MapOffice™ Advanced; the village’s in-house
mapping software. Each of these points then had a hyperlink, that when
clicked, opened up the corresponding image from the village servers.
This allows the Village’s Capital Projects department, as well as
others, to click on a section of Village owned road and then view the
associated pavement image. Without an interactive map and GIS, the
village would not be able to view the images without having to search
through the system folders to find each image based off an ID system.

Street Pavement Ratings

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In 2011, The Village of Wheeling hired MDS Technologies to drive
around the village and collect data related to the village streets and
sidewalks. Pictures were taken of each village street using a special
vehicle and each street was assigned a Pavement Condition Index (PCI)
Number. The numbers range from 1, which is the lowest and correlates to
the street needing a lot of work, to 100 which is the highest and means
that the street is in perfect condition. The village received a report
giving a PCI rating to each street, or section of street that they
owned. Although the ratings are helpful to see what individual streets
are in most need of resurfacing, the engineering department wanted to
see which neighborhoods needed the most work.

Using village subdivisions, the streets were clipped and then
combined into different groups based off the subdivision boundaries.
Instead of just taking the average of all the PCI ratings in each
subdivision, the engineering department wanted to get a weighted average
based off the area of pavement for each street within the subdivision.
This would give the department a better idea of which subdivisions
would have the most pavement to resurface as opposed to one small street
with a very low PCI rating bringing the average down. By using GIS,
the Village of Wheeling was able to compile a lot of data from an
outside source and turn it into a way of determining which subdivisions
in the village need the most street resurfacing.

GIS aids in identifying road reconstruction projects

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Pozzolan is a material, when combined with calcium hydroxide,
exhibits the properties of cement and is commonly used as an addition to
concrete mixtures for road base. During the late 60’s and early 70’s,
The Village of Wheeling used pozzolan in many of its roads that were
built or reconstructed at that time. Eventually, the roads that were
built with pozzolanic material started to crack and break apart due to
the amount of moisture that pozzolanic material retains. Even when the
roads were resurfaced, the material would cause it to crack and shift
after a few years. This resulted in the roads having to be resurfaced
more frequently. The Village decided that it would eventually have to
rebuild the base of all roads built with pozzolanic material that
haven’t been rebuilt already.

The engineering department requested that a map be created showing
the locations of all roads known to still contain pozzolanic material.
The department also requested that the area of each road surface be
calculated so a replacement cost could be estimated for all the
pozzolanic roads. Using existing base data, the roads were mapped out
and then using the area of the road surface, replacement estimations
were made. By using GIS, the Village of Wheeling was able to quickly
map out the locations of roads built with pozzolanic material and then
create an accurate cost estimate for replacing the material.

Street Light Inventory in GIS

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The Village of Wheeling Public Works Department is currently in the
process of doing a full inventory of all the street lights in the
village. This entails locating all the street light poles, assigning
each light and pole a unique ID number, and then detailing all the
specific information about each light such as the bulb type, bulb
wattage, pole material, etc… Eventually, this information will be added
into the MapOffice™ Advanced (the village’s in-house interactive map
program), so that the Public Works Department can view all the street
lights on a computer and then link to work orders reports in the village
database.

A series of maps were created and printed out so that the field crews
could travel through the village and record IDs and any other relevant
information for each street light. The IDs would be then referenced in a
table so that the attribute information for each light could be linked
to the appropriate street light location. The data will then be brought
back to the Public Works building and added to the village’s databases
so that it can be viewed in MapOffice™ Advanced. Eventually, all work
orders for street lights will be linked to the lights on the map (via
the unique ID) so that the public works crew can view the entire history
for each light just by clicking on it. By collecting all the data and
then implementing it into MapOffice™ Advanced, the Public Works
Department will easily be able to view all the street light information
in one centralized location.

Nicor gas billing review

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In the Village of Wheeling, each resident with gas service from
NiCOR, has to pay a small tax to the village which is included in their
bill. In an effort to make sure the village was receiving all possible
tax money, it requested a list of the addresses that NiCOR had for
Wheeling, so that a review could be done. The Finance Department
requested that all addresses from NiCOR be mapped out and lists be made
detailing what matched and what didn’t match. The information would be
then sent back to NiCOR so that any inconsistencies could be reviewed
and corrected.

The list of addresses were first geocoded (a process of assigning an
address to a location on a map) to get a preliminary list of what did
and didn’t match. The unmatched addresses were then reviewed to
determine why they were not matching i.e. misspelling, wrong town,
non-existent address, etc… Two lists were then created to be sent back
to NiCOR; one that was all the reviewed addresses provided by NiCOR that
did not match the address database maintained by the village and one
that was a list of addresses maintained by the village, but were not in
the list provided by NiCOR. These two lists, along with a map showing
unmatched addresses, were the final products. After NiCOR received the
data from Wheeling, they made the appropriate changes resulting in the
village receiving tax money they did not receive in the past. By using
GIS, the village was able to easily find missing revenue that they might
not have found in the past.

Calculating Road Curb Replacement

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When repaving village streets after maintenance or a repair, the
Village of Wheeling typically has to take in account the amount of curb
that has to be rebuilt or repaired. The price of the repairs depends on
the length of the curb and the different types of aprons that feed into
the street i.e. driveway, parking lot, sidewalk, etc… The engineering
department wanted to know if there was an easier way to calculate the
amount of curb length for each village owned street and get a count of
the number of aprons along the roadway as well.

Using the base map data provided by Ayres Associates, all the curbs
in the village were split by their respective roads. The amount of curb
length split by the road boundaries was added to the road data table
along with a count of any sidewalk, driveway, or parking lot that
intersected the original road data. With the data all divided and
organized, a map was created allowing an engineer to select a section of
a road and then view a table showing the length of curb for that
section and the number of aprons along the road. By using GIS, the
Village of Wheeling was able to cut down the amount of time it would
take to manually calculate curb length as well as provide a quick way to
make estimates on the cost of repaving certain streets

Calculating Road Curb Replacement

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When repaving village streets after maintenance or a repair, the
Village of Wheeling typically has to take in account the amount of curb
that has to be rebuilt or repaired. The price of the repairs depends on
the length of the curb and the different types of aprons that feed into
the street i.e. driveway, parking lot, sidewalk, etc… The engineering
department wanted to know if there was an easier way to calculate the
amount of curb length for each village owned street and get a count of
the number of aprons along the roadway as well.

Using the base map data provided by Ayres Associates, all the curbs
in the village were split by their respective roads. The amount of curb
length split by the road boundaries was added to the road data table
along with a count of any sidewalk, driveway, or parking lot that
intersected the original road data. With the data all divided and
organized, a map was created allowing an engineer to select a section of
a road and then view a table showing the length of curb for that
section and the number of aprons along the road. By using GIS, the
Village of Wheeling was able to cut down the amount of time it would
take to manually calculate curb length as well as provide a quick way to
make estimates on the cost of repaving certain streets