Crime analysis with GIS

Blog_CrimeanalysiswithGIS.png

It often seems that when crimes happen we seem to hear about them on
the news. On the contrary, many crimes are reported that don’t attract
high media attention. Which ever happens, it is extremely important
that the Police Department is aware of the crime and that the activity
is recorded for future analytical purposes. After these crimes are
recorded what types of analytical operations take place? Are these
crimes reviewed individually or compared to others in a group? Does
geography play a factor?

The Police Department for the City of Park Ridge, Illinois thought
that geography may have been a factor in some of their most recent
burglary reports but they needed an easy way to review this information.
For this portion of their analysis they decided to take advantage of
the resources within the Geographical Information Systems (GIS)
Department to help map out the addresses of all the recent burglary
activity within the city limits. A list of all burglary location
addresses for a month long period was submitted to the GIS Department
and then mapped out using the software tools found in application that
GIS uses. Not only was the result quick in also displayed that there
may be a trend in the type of burglaries because the incidents did
indeed occur close in geographic proximity. Once the map was completed
it was then published to a PDF so that it could be sent to the
appropriate personnel in the Police Department (i.e. detectives) for
review and potential field use.

A map that once took an hour to complete manually, now only took
fifteen minutes. Additionally, the map was easily distributable which
saved time in the long run and made the overall process more efficient.

Crime analysis with GIS

Blog_CrimeanalysiswithGIS.png

It often seems that when crimes happen we seem to hear about them on
the news. On the contrary, many crimes are reported that don’t attract
high media attention. Which ever happens, it is extremely important
that the Police Department is aware of the crime and that the activity
is recorded for future analytical purposes. After these crimes are
recorded what types of analytical operations take place? Are these
crimes reviewed individually or compared to others in a group? Does
geography play a factor?

The Police Department for the City of Park Ridge, Illinois thought
that geography may have been a factor in some of their most recent
burglary reports but they needed an easy way to review this information.
For this portion of their analysis they decided to take advantage of
the resources within the Geographical Information Systems (GIS)
Department to help map out the addresses of all the recent burglary
activity within the city limits. A list of all burglary location
addresses for a month long period was submitted to the GIS Department
and then mapped out using the software tools found in application that
GIS uses. Not only was the result quick in also displayed that there
may be a trend in the type of burglaries because the incidents did
indeed occur close in geographic proximity. Once the map was completed
it was then published to a PDF so that it could be sent to the
appropriate personnel in the Police Department (i.e. detectives) for
review and potential field use.

A map that once took an hour to complete manually, now only took
fifteen minutes. Additionally, the map was easily distributable which
saved time in the long run and made the overall process more efficient.