Editing water utility data using Mobile GIS

​Village staffs in the water utility department, including managers,
operators and executive directors, need an updated understanding of how
utility systems are performing, where employees should be focusing their
efforts and how village residents are affected. Geographic Information
System (GIS) can help to provide a dynamic view of operations and
activities throughout your community. One of the main components of
making this system work is consistently updating your data so that it is
current. While GIS staff knows how to enter and manage GIS systems they
often don’t have the expertise or the opportunity to make data changes
out in the field.

With the availability of mobile computers and skilled public works
staff it is now possible that the ones out in the field doing the manual
work can also make the updates to the GIS. This significantly
streamlines the workflow process. Crews will have more up to date
information in the field, better information in the field beyond the
labels on their paper maps, and won’t have to fill out paper forms. The
important part in implementing mobile GIS updating is that you keep it
straightforward. Once users are comfortable with mobile mapping you can
expand its functionality. This summer the village did just that by
having its valve turning GIS data updated in the field.

Using a rugged laptop, public works staff, with great success, has
been updating all the system valve data for the village water utility as
they turn valves. When completed this data will be checked and imported
back into the utility system for display in key village programs like
MapOffice™ Advanced. It is a great start to what mobile GIS and is just
the beginning for the village’s plans for mobile GIS editing.

Editing water utility data using Mobile GIS

​Village staffs in the water utility department, including managers,
operators and executive directors, need an updated understanding of how
utility systems are performing, where employees should be focusing their
efforts and how village residents are affected. Geographic Information
System (GIS) can help to provide a dynamic view of operations and
activities throughout your community. One of the main components of
making this system work is consistently updating your data so that it is
current. While GIS staff knows how to enter and manage GIS systems they
often don’t have the expertise or the opportunity to make data changes
out in the field.

With the availability of mobile computers and skilled public works
staff it is now possible that the ones out in the field doing the manual
work can also make the updates to the GIS. This significantly
streamlines the workflow process. Crews will have more up to date
information in the field, better information in the field beyond the
labels on their paper maps, and won’t have to fill out paper forms. The
important part in implementing mobile GIS updating is that you keep it
straightforward. Once users are comfortable with mobile mapping you can
expand its functionality. This summer the village did just that by
having its valve turning GIS data updated in the field.

Using a rugged laptop, public works staff, with great success, has
been updating all the system valve data for the village water utility as
they turn valves. When completed this data will be checked and imported
back into the utility system for display in key village programs like
MapOffice™ Advanced. It is a great start to what mobile GIS and is just
the beginning for the village’s plans for mobile GIS editing.