Federal urban aid systems

​In 1916, the United States created the Federal-aid Highway Program
with the primary objective being the improvement of rural roads. This
changed with the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1944, which authorized the
first specific funds for urban highways, specifically the creation of a
formula for the distribution of federal-aid funds among the primary,
secondary, and urban systems. Today, there are three federal-aid
systems: The Interstate Highway System, the Federal-aid Primary highway
system (FAP), and the Federal-aid Secondary highway system. The
Federal-aid Secondary highway system is broken into secondary non-urban
(FAS) and secondary urban (FAU). The interstate system consists of
routes connecting and running through and around major urban centers.
The FAP consists of a system of connected main highways, while the FAS
are composed of principal secondary and feeder routes. Both aid systems
are chosen by state highway departments and local officials, but are
subject to approval by the Bureau of Public Roads. Having roads
designated as federal-aid means that the federal and state governments
provide funds and take care of repairs instead of the community in which
the road is located. This allows the local government to spend money in
other areas.

The Village of Wheeling currently has 12 routes designated as either
FAP or FAU. These consist of major roads throughout the village such as
Palatine Road, Wolf Rd, and Milwaukee Ave. The village submitted a
proposal to add 6 more roads to the Federal-Aid Urban System. These
include: Anthony Road, Equestrian Drive, Lexington Drive, Manchester
Drive, Northgate Parkway, and Strong Avenue. The village’s capital
projects department requested that the Geographic Information System
(GIS) department create a large map showing all current and proposed FAP
and FAU routes as well as small 8.5” x 11” maps detailing the starting
and ends of each routes with all existing traffic signals and stop
signs, to be submitted for approval. This saved the department the time
and effort previously required to create detailed maps by hand or using
an inefficient, program.

As of May 2009, a decision has not been reached on the approval of
the six routes as Federal-aid routes, but GIS provided the capital
projects department an easy way to submit their proposal without
spending a significant amount of time creating the maps needed for the
proposal.

Federal urban aid systems

​In 1916, the United States created the Federal-aid Highway Program
with the primary objective being the improvement of rural roads. This
changed with the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1944, which authorized the
first specific funds for urban highways, specifically the creation of a
formula for the distribution of federal-aid funds among the primary,
secondary, and urban systems. Today, there are three federal-aid
systems: The Interstate Highway System, the Federal-aid Primary highway
system (FAP), and the Federal-aid Secondary highway system. The
Federal-aid Secondary highway system is broken into secondary non-urban
(FAS) and secondary urban (FAU). The interstate system consists of
routes connecting and running through and around major urban centers.
The FAP consists of a system of connected main highways, while the FAS
are composed of principal secondary and feeder routes. Both aid systems
are chosen by state highway departments and local officials, but are
subject to approval by the Bureau of Public Roads. Having roads
designated as federal-aid means that the federal and state governments
provide funds and take care of repairs instead of the community in which
the road is located. This allows the local government to spend money in
other areas.

The Village of Wheeling currently has 12 routes designated as either
FAP or FAU. These consist of major roads throughout the village such as
Palatine Road, Wolf Rd, and Milwaukee Ave. The village submitted a
proposal to add 6 more roads to the Federal-Aid Urban System. These
include: Anthony Road, Equestrian Drive, Lexington Drive, Manchester
Drive, Northgate Parkway, and Strong Avenue. The village’s capital
projects department requested that the Geographic Information System
(GIS) department create a large map showing all current and proposed FAP
and FAU routes as well as small 8.5” x 11” maps detailing the starting
and ends of each routes with all existing traffic signals and stop
signs, to be submitted for approval. This saved the department the time
and effort previously required to create detailed maps by hand or using
an inefficient, program.

As of May 2009, a decision has not been reached on the approval of
the six routes as Federal-aid routes, but GIS provided the capital
projects department an easy way to submit their proposal without
spending a significant amount of time creating the maps needed for the
proposal.