Finance and permtting interacting with GIS

Blog_Finance_and_permtting_interacting.png

The Tyler Edens application is an important financial and permit
enterprise system that allows the city easily track finances and permit
status. The application will only function efficiently if it has good
base information such as zoning districts, addresses, and owner
information. This information is readily available but requires the
tools within the GIS to combine this information into one table. The GIS
tools also clean up the County provided assessor owner information to
assure owners within the city of Highland Park has correct street names.
The GIS office annually creates a flattened import file that is used to
keep the Edens data current.

A second role of the GIS is providing the layers for the interactive
map within Edens. This map shows parcels, buildings, and utilities. By
using the map, users scan interactively select properties and see the
related records for each property. This makes workflows more efficient
as users do not need to manually search by addresses.

A final support process of the GIS is creating the impervious values
for each property. The impervious areas used to asses a storm water fee
for water billing customers. Without GIS, the Edens application would
not contain much of the valuable information it now contains and would
create more frustration for users trying to use the application.

Finance and permtting interacting with GIS

Blog_Finance_and_permtting_interacting.png

The Tyler Edens application is an important financial and permit
enterprise system that allows the city easily track finances and permit
status. The application will only function efficiently if it has good
base information such as zoning districts, addresses, and owner
information. This information is readily available but requires the
tools within the GIS to combine this information into one table. The GIS
tools also clean up the County provided assessor owner information to
assure owners within the city of Highland Park has correct street names.
The GIS office annually creates a flattened import file that is used to
keep the Edens data current.

A second role of the GIS is providing the layers for the interactive
map within Edens. This map shows parcels, buildings, and utilities. By
using the map, users scan interactively select properties and see the
related records for each property. This makes workflows more efficient
as users do not need to manually search by addresses.

A final support process of the GIS is creating the impervious values
for each property. The impervious areas used to asses a storm water fee
for water billing customers. Without GIS, the Edens application would
not contain much of the valuable information it now contains and would
create more frustration for users trying to use the application.