Foreclosures and teardown analysis

Blog_Foreclosures_and_teardown_analysis.jpg

Understanding the trends of what is happening in the housing market
is difficult to do especially if you are not in the realty business.
Houses may be sold, rented or even more dramatic, torn down in order to
build a new one. In this article we will focus on two parts of the
housing market that at times can have a significant impact on a local
community, housing demolitions and property foreclosures.

Unless you are out driving the streets everyday it may be tough to
locate all of the homes in a community that have been torn down or are
vacant due to foreclosures. At the Village of Morton Grove, like many
other community governments, they have had a permitting application in
place for many years in order to help them keep track of important
construction operations that require permits. On top of this software,
the village has also invested in a service to retrieve property
foreclosure information from the internet. But how do you analyze all of
these records spatially in order to know if there are any trends in
housing within your community borders? For this difficulty alone, it
makes analysis a tough thing to do unless you have a visual component
such as an accurate map.

This is where the Geographic Information System (GIS) Department was
able to lend a helping hand. The ability to retrieve records from the
permitting application in the form of an address and knowing what type
of permit was issued (i.e. single family demolition) was a strong step
in the right direction. By having a simple common denominator in the
form of an address allowed the two departments to work with each other
and better yet, allowed these addresses to be displayed spatially on a
map. By using a tool called geocoding, the GIS was able to search a
address data file and locate where an address falls on a particular
parcel. Moreover, this same geocoding process was followed for property
foreclosure information. Once these addresses were converted into a true
geographical location, they could then be represented on a map allowing
building officials to begin analyzing the trends that are happening on
the streets within their community.

Without being able to locate these demolitions and property
foreclosures geographically, it is very difficult to analyze what trends
may be forming on a daily basis. Moreover, instead of leaving these
records hidden in a database it is much easier to give this data a
geographical location in the form of a map which in turn can to tell the
village board what is really happening to the homes within their
community.

Overall, it is very important for a community to see the big picture
in order to identify where problems have occurred and where new ones may
arise in the future. Moreover, it is also worthy to note how multiple
departments can work together at identifying these problems in the first
place so that they may plan more affectively for what be coming on the
road ahead.

Foreclosures and teardown analysis

Blog_Foreclosures_and_teardown_analysis.jpg

Understanding the trends of what is happening in the housing market
is difficult to do especially if you are not in the realty business.
Houses may be sold, rented or even more dramatic, torn down in order to
build a new one. In this article we will focus on two parts of the
housing market that at times can have a significant impact on a local
community, housing demolitions and property foreclosures.

Unless you are out driving the streets everyday it may be tough to
locate all of the homes in a community that have been torn down or are
vacant due to foreclosures. At the Village of Morton Grove, like many
other community governments, they have had a permitting application in
place for many years in order to help them keep track of important
construction operations that require permits. On top of this software,
the village has also invested in a service to retrieve property
foreclosure information from the internet. But how do you analyze all of
these records spatially in order to know if there are any trends in
housing within your community borders? For this difficulty alone, it
makes analysis a tough thing to do unless you have a visual component
such as an accurate map.

This is where the Geographic Information System (GIS) Department was
able to lend a helping hand. The ability to retrieve records from the
permitting application in the form of an address and knowing what type
of permit was issued (i.e. single family demolition) was a strong step
in the right direction. By having a simple common denominator in the
form of an address allowed the two departments to work with each other
and better yet, allowed these addresses to be displayed spatially on a
map. By using a tool called geocoding, the GIS was able to search a
address data file and locate where an address falls on a particular
parcel. Moreover, this same geocoding process was followed for property
foreclosure information. Once these addresses were converted into a true
geographical location, they could then be represented on a map allowing
building officials to begin analyzing the trends that are happening on
the streets within their community.

Without being able to locate these demolitions and property
foreclosures geographically, it is very difficult to analyze what trends
may be forming on a daily basis. Moreover, instead of leaving these
records hidden in a database it is much easier to give this data a
geographical location in the form of a map which in turn can to tell the
village board what is really happening to the homes within their
community.

Overall, it is very important for a community to see the big picture
in order to identify where problems have occurred and where new ones may
arise in the future. Moreover, it is also worthy to note how multiple
departments can work together at identifying these problems in the first
place so that they may plan more affectively for what be coming on the
road ahead.