GIS assisting with hydrant testing

Blog_GIS_assisting_with_hydrant_testing.jpg

Utility asset management is a critical component of any local
government’s annual operations. As part of its annual utility
maintenance schedule, the City of Des Plaines performs field tests of
fire hydrants in select areas of the city to ensure that they have the
correct water pressure and are still operating at the expected level.
These tests are conducted by the Fire Department and require significant
man-hours to complete. To reduce the amount of time needed to locate a
hydrant scheduled for testing, the department requested a series of
maps that could be used in the field for locating.

To fill this request, the city’s Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
department created a map book, or a series of coincident maps that show
a larger area divided into a collection of smaller areas, that could be
used in the field. While a city-wide map showing all the hydrants was
also developed for general reference, having the smaller, more mobile
maps allows the department to use them in the field as they are
conducting each test, giving them a more detailed view of the testing
area and the location of each hydrant. Using these products will help
to reduce the amount of staff time needed to locate the hydrants and
provide more time for developing an efficient testing schedule that will
ultimately lower the amount of time needed to complete the testing
process.

GIS assisting with hydrant testing

Blog_GIS_assisting_with_hydrant_testing.jpg

Utility asset management is a critical component of any local
government’s annual operations. As part of its annual utility
maintenance schedule, the City of Des Plaines performs field tests of
fire hydrants in select areas of the city to ensure that they have the
correct water pressure and are still operating at the expected level.
These tests are conducted by the Fire Department and require significant
man-hours to complete. To reduce the amount of time needed to locate a
hydrant scheduled for testing, the department requested a series of
maps that could be used in the field for locating.

To fill this request, the city’s Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
department created a map book, or a series of coincident maps that show
a larger area divided into a collection of smaller areas, that could be
used in the field. While a city-wide map showing all the hydrants was
also developed for general reference, having the smaller, more mobile
maps allows the department to use them in the field as they are
conducting each test, giving them a more detailed view of the testing
area and the location of each hydrant. Using these products will help
to reduce the amount of staff time needed to locate the hydrants and
provide more time for developing an efficient testing schedule that will
ultimately lower the amount of time needed to complete the testing
process.