GIS assists with sewer flushing

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Maintaining the cleanliness of a city’s sewer system can be time
intensive and costly. There is the purchase of the sewer cleaning
machine, the actual flushing of the sewer lines and the occasional
cutting of tree roots. With all of this work there usually comes a need
for a Public Works Department to track the locations of sewer lines that
have been cleaned. Tracking the clean-up progress of these lines not
only allows the Public Works Director to better plan for future sewer
cleaning work, it also demonstrates to the city council the efforts that
have come forth by the city to remedy an on-going problem.

For the City of Park Ridge they rely on the services of the
Geographic Information System (GIS) Department in order to take textual
spreadsheet data and make it come to life in the form of a map. This
concept is nothing new but it is something that usually tells a better
story than the simply distributing handouts detailing the streets where
sewer cleaning has taken place. For this project all sewer lines that
were recently flushed were extracted from existing GIS sewer utility
data as well as given the appropriate attributes as to when the sewer
was last flushed and whether there were tree root problems or not.

Once this data was created it was then mapped out in conjunction with
the city’s sewer system resulting in an end product that easily
displayed the how much of the city’s sewer system had been cleaned in
last six months. Additionally, the power of mapping this project out in
GIS will allow the Public Works Department to track things going forward
as well as retrieve statistical information on the lengths and sizes of
all pipes being cleaned should they need this information at any given
time.

GIS assists with sewer flushing

Blog_GISassistswithsewerflushing.png

Maintaining the cleanliness of a city’s sewer system can be time
intensive and costly. There is the purchase of the sewer cleaning
machine, the actual flushing of the sewer lines and the occasional
cutting of tree roots. With all of this work there usually comes a need
for a Public Works Department to track the locations of sewer lines that
have been cleaned. Tracking the clean-up progress of these lines not
only allows the Public Works Director to better plan for future sewer
cleaning work, it also demonstrates to the city council the efforts that
have come forth by the city to remedy an on-going problem.

For the City of Park Ridge they rely on the services of the
Geographic Information System (GIS) Department in order to take textual
spreadsheet data and make it come to life in the form of a map. This
concept is nothing new but it is something that usually tells a better
story than the simply distributing handouts detailing the streets where
sewer cleaning has taken place. For this project all sewer lines that
were recently flushed were extracted from existing GIS sewer utility
data as well as given the appropriate attributes as to when the sewer
was last flushed and whether there were tree root problems or not.

Once this data was created it was then mapped out in conjunction with
the city’s sewer system resulting in an end product that easily
displayed the how much of the city’s sewer system had been cleaned in
last six months. Additionally, the power of mapping this project out in
GIS will allow the Public Works Department to track things going forward
as well as retrieve statistical information on the lengths and sizes of
all pipes being cleaned should they need this information at any given
time.