GIS Supports Sewer Lining Project

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Over time sewer utility pipes deteriorate and may eventually collapse
causing an even bigger problem for a municipality to replace. Being
able to locate these problem pipes before these bigger problems occur is
ultimately the best practice. What normally happens at the local
government level is a problem area is identified by the Engineering
Department based on their analysis or by resident complaints. From
there, the Engineering Department will usually contract a company to
televise these problem pipes so they can review what is really happening
underground. If the pipes are in really bad shape than a full
replacement may be the only solution. Often times though, it is just a
case of tree root obstruction or deterioration to the pipe that is
restricting the flow of water. In these instances on e successful
solution that a municipality may select is to cut out all tree roots
with a small machine fed through the existing pipe and then line the
sewer with a manufactured heat sensitive tube.

In simple terms, it is called sewer lining and is something that the
City of Park Ridge, Illinois has recently started doing again.
Additionally, the City has leveraged the use of their Geographical
Information Systems (GIS) Department to help create maps depicting the
locations of the pipes that are to be reconstructed. The maps are
simple in nature but add to the City’s process of what they supply to
the contractor doing the work. So, instead of trying to describe the
scope of work, the City Engineer now has a visual to give to the
contractor that shows the location of the job, the pipes to be lined or
cleaned, as well as the attributes of each pipe that will be worked on
(i.e. size, material, and length). All in all, sometimes it is the
small things that make a contract go better and in this example it is
easy to see how a simple map from GIS may help alleviate some confusion.

GIS Supports Sewer Lining Project

Blog_GISSupportsSewerLiningProject2.png

Over time sewer utility pipes deteriorate and may eventually collapse
causing an even bigger problem for a municipality to replace. Being
able to locate these problem pipes before these bigger problems occur is
ultimately the best practice. What normally happens at the local
government level is a problem area is identified by the Engineering
Department based on their analysis or by resident complaints. From
there, the Engineering Department will usually contract a company to
televise these problem pipes so they can review what is really happening
underground. If the pipes are in really bad shape than a full
replacement may be the only solution. Often times though, it is just a
case of tree root obstruction or deterioration to the pipe that is
restricting the flow of water. In these instances on e successful
solution that a municipality may select is to cut out all tree roots
with a small machine fed through the existing pipe and then line the
sewer with a manufactured heat sensitive tube.

In simple terms, it is called sewer lining and is something that the
City of Park Ridge, Illinois has recently started doing again.
Additionally, the City has leveraged the use of their Geographical
Information Systems (GIS) Department to help create maps depicting the
locations of the pipes that are to be reconstructed. The maps are
simple in nature but add to the City’s process of what they supply to
the contractor doing the work. So, instead of trying to describe the
scope of work, the City Engineer now has a visual to give to the
contractor that shows the location of the job, the pipes to be lined or
cleaned, as well as the attributes of each pipe that will be worked on
(i.e. size, material, and length). All in all, sometimes it is the
small things that make a contract go better and in this example it is
easy to see how a simple map from GIS may help alleviate some confusion.