GIS used for flood analysis

Blog_GISusedforfloodanalysis.png

Although severe rain storms hitting Park Ridge have slowed in numbers
recently, there still is a need to find ways to analyze past events in
order to help with the future incidents; for being prepared with the
proper analytical tools is never a bad idea and is something that is
important to the city. With these ideas in mind, the city’s Engineering
and Building Departments continue to turn to their Geographic
Information System (GIS) Department looking for new ways to use
technology as a mechanism for analyzing what might be happening in the
real world.

Two recent projects that have shown potential to be everyday
analytical tools for the city have come in the form of a flood complaint
density study and a detailed drainage basin location map. The flood
complaint density study was performed by taking data from the flood
survey database, mapping it out and then using complex GIS tools to
create density locations. The end product displayed a dark color where
many flooding complaints occurred at a high density and a light color
where the density of complaints was weak. What seems like a simple map
can now be used as an analytical tool for identifying potential problem
areas of flooding. On the other hand, the detailed drainage basin
location map was also constructed using complex GIS tools but the end
product details how water may flow from a high point of elevation to a
low point of elevation. This map can also be used as an analytical tool
giving the city staff a better idea of where the water may be flowing
and will prove beneficial for when specific residents complain about
flooding in their yard.

Both products leverage the power behind the GIS tools and thus take
information that was once static and make it more usable, a good example
of how to take data to the another level in order to help find
solutions to everyday problems.

GIS used for flood analysis

Blog_GISusedforfloodanalysis.png

Although severe rain storms hitting Park Ridge have slowed in numbers
recently, there still is a need to find ways to analyze past events in
order to help with the future incidents; for being prepared with the
proper analytical tools is never a bad idea and is something that is
important to the city. With these ideas in mind, the city’s Engineering
and Building Departments continue to turn to their Geographic
Information System (GIS) Department looking for new ways to use
technology as a mechanism for analyzing what might be happening in the
real world.

Two recent projects that have shown potential to be everyday
analytical tools for the city have come in the form of a flood complaint
density study and a detailed drainage basin location map. The flood
complaint density study was performed by taking data from the flood
survey database, mapping it out and then using complex GIS tools to
create density locations. The end product displayed a dark color where
many flooding complaints occurred at a high density and a light color
where the density of complaints was weak. What seems like a simple map
can now be used as an analytical tool for identifying potential problem
areas of flooding. On the other hand, the detailed drainage basin
location map was also constructed using complex GIS tools but the end
product details how water may flow from a high point of elevation to a
low point of elevation. This map can also be used as an analytical tool
giving the city staff a better idea of where the water may be flowing
and will prove beneficial for when specific residents complain about
flooding in their yard.

Both products leverage the power behind the GIS tools and thus take
information that was once static and make it more usable, a good example
of how to take data to the another level in order to help find
solutions to everyday problems.