Hydrant water flow rate mapping

Blog_Hydrant_water_flow.png

The Village of Glencoe wanted to link their hydrant database to
hydrant locations in their GIS to create a series of hydrant maps. The
Geographic Information System (GIS) Department along with the Glencoe
Department of Public Safety coordinated a project plan to synchronize
highly critical hydrant operational data from a database to the hydrant
features within the GIS. The Public Safety Department is using a
ProHydrant Program to systematically test all hydrants throughout the
village. It was determined the data collected in the field could be
used more efficiently if it was transferred to the GIS. A primary goal
was creating a product to facilitate analysis, mapping, and other
functions.

The project involved three parties, including the Public Safety
Department, ProHydrant software vendor, and the GIS Department.
Communication occurred mostly between the Public Safety Department and
the vendor. The only item requested from the GIS Department was to add
the FeatureID to the database. This a unique identifier field used in
the GIS system to track hydrant features. With this unique id, the GIS
system is able to associate data from the vendor database back into the
GIS system.

This vendor field information is extremely useful because it enhances
the GIS database by making it a more informative product. Some
examples of hydrant data collected in the field included addresses,
hydrant flow rates, hydrant type and model, color, condition status, and
other important information collected while the vendor conducted
field-testing.

The collected field data was provided to the GIS Department and then
the data was linked into the system using the FeatureID field. This was
completed quickly and a related table of field information was linked
to the hydrant feature in the GIS system. This is important because it
allowed for the mapping and display all the collected field information.
In addition, we transferred all the hydrant flow data collected in the
field into the GIS database. This is important because it allowed the
GIS system to display the water flow rates of hydrants on a map giving
the Public Safety Department the ability to spatially and visually
inspect the data throughout the Village. In addition, the data now had
the ability to be incorporated into other GIS products including the GIS
Consortium MapOffice™ Advance, the GIS Consortium Mobile Data View,
ESRI ArcReader, and ESRI ArcView.

In conclusion, GIS was a powerful tool that provided a common
platform for data reporting and visualization of geographical
information. The project showcased in this article is a prime example
of how data from outside sources can be shared and used more efficiently
through GIS.

Hydrant water flow rate mapping

Blog_Hydrant_water_flow.png

The Village of Glencoe wanted to link their hydrant database to
hydrant locations in their GIS to create a series of hydrant maps. The
Geographic Information System (GIS) Department along with the Glencoe
Department of Public Safety coordinated a project plan to synchronize
highly critical hydrant operational data from a database to the hydrant
features within the GIS. The Public Safety Department is using a
ProHydrant Program to systematically test all hydrants throughout the
village. It was determined the data collected in the field could be
used more efficiently if it was transferred to the GIS. A primary goal
was creating a product to facilitate analysis, mapping, and other
functions.

The project involved three parties, including the Public Safety
Department, ProHydrant software vendor, and the GIS Department.
Communication occurred mostly between the Public Safety Department and
the vendor. The only item requested from the GIS Department was to add
the FeatureID to the database. This a unique identifier field used in
the GIS system to track hydrant features. With this unique id, the GIS
system is able to associate data from the vendor database back into the
GIS system.

This vendor field information is extremely useful because it enhances
the GIS database by making it a more informative product. Some
examples of hydrant data collected in the field included addresses,
hydrant flow rates, hydrant type and model, color, condition status, and
other important information collected while the vendor conducted
field-testing.

The collected field data was provided to the GIS Department and then
the data was linked into the system using the FeatureID field. This was
completed quickly and a related table of field information was linked
to the hydrant feature in the GIS system. This is important because it
allowed for the mapping and display all the collected field information.
In addition, we transferred all the hydrant flow data collected in the
field into the GIS database. This is important because it allowed the
GIS system to display the water flow rates of hydrants on a map giving
the Public Safety Department the ability to spatially and visually
inspect the data throughout the Village. In addition, the data now had
the ability to be incorporated into other GIS products including the GIS
Consortium MapOffice™ Advance, the GIS Consortium Mobile Data View,
ESRI ArcReader, and ESRI ArcView.

In conclusion, GIS was a powerful tool that provided a common
platform for data reporting and visualization of geographical
information. The project showcased in this article is a prime example
of how data from outside sources can be shared and used more efficiently
through GIS.