Looking at front yard setbacks

Blog_Looking_at_front_yard_setbacks.png

The Village of Lincolnshire like many municipalities relies on zoning
ordinances to help shape and control the growth of the Village. Along
with zoning requirements, the Village also regulates development of
residential zones by deploying setback regulations. These regulations
help control the size and placement of structures on the lot to ensure
adequate spacing within structures within each district or block. This
ensures that any given subdivision, street, or block is appealing and
avoids any possible situation of residential structures being built too
large for the lot it is on.

The Community Development Department approached the GIS Department to
determine the feasibility of visually displaying and mapping the
setback regulations throughout the village. It was determined that the
data provided gave the required information to place the regulations
into a GIS layer viewable in map or GIS applications. The GIS
Department began to organize and develop a draft map that displayed each
setback regulation, along with the property on each block that
established the setback, and labels that displayed the extents of the
setbacks. The data was designed to display colored lines with labeled
values for each setback and highlighted the property that established
the Setback. The goal of this map was to vividly show the setbacks so
they can be observed on a wall-mounted map in the Community Development
Department. During the review process, the map took on a few different
forms and finally it was decided to break the village into quadrants to
achieve a better visible scale. A snapshot of the map is displayed to
the right.

The outcome of this map is still under development, but the value of
the map will be realized when completed and the village staff will be
able to see all setbacks in visual form for the entire village and
compare how areas are being developed. The map will also serve as a
historical and archiving tool storing this information in visual form
outside the normal text environment. Without GIS, this task would be a
challenge to complete.

Looking at front yard setbacks

Blog_Looking_at_front_yard_setbacks.png

The Village of Lincolnshire like many municipalities relies on zoning
ordinances to help shape and control the growth of the Village. Along
with zoning requirements, the Village also regulates development of
residential zones by deploying setback regulations. These regulations
help control the size and placement of structures on the lot to ensure
adequate spacing within structures within each district or block. This
ensures that any given subdivision, street, or block is appealing and
avoids any possible situation of residential structures being built too
large for the lot it is on.

The Community Development Department approached the GIS Department to
determine the feasibility of visually displaying and mapping the
setback regulations throughout the village. It was determined that the
data provided gave the required information to place the regulations
into a GIS layer viewable in map or GIS applications. The GIS
Department began to organize and develop a draft map that displayed each
setback regulation, along with the property on each block that
established the setback, and labels that displayed the extents of the
setbacks. The data was designed to display colored lines with labeled
values for each setback and highlighted the property that established
the Setback. The goal of this map was to vividly show the setbacks so
they can be observed on a wall-mounted map in the Community Development
Department. During the review process, the map took on a few different
forms and finally it was decided to break the village into quadrants to
achieve a better visible scale. A snapshot of the map is displayed to
the right.

The outcome of this map is still under development, but the value of
the map will be realized when completed and the village staff will be
able to see all setbacks in visual form for the entire village and
compare how areas are being developed. The map will also serve as a
historical and archiving tool storing this information in visual form
outside the normal text environment. Without GIS, this task would be a
challenge to complete.