Mapping zoning right of way

Blog_Mappingzoningrightofway.png

The Village of Oak Brook has numerous private roads that are not
maintained by the village. As a result, if a certain neighborhood wants a
road to be converted to a public road they must adhere to village
zoning code.

Two small, adjacent subdivisions in Oak Brook have put in a request
to have their private roads converted to public roads in order to save
money in maintenance fees. The first step that is required is for the
village is to evaluate whether or not these private roads follow village
zoning codes, and if they don’t, then the village must create a plan to
convert these roads to village zoning standards.

In working with the engineering department I was able to create
layers that display the minimum requirements for right of way and
setback sizes. The map displays where the current road is, and the area
that would be required to be converted to village property in order to
adhere to village code.

This map assisted the village by providing them a visual reference to
present these neighborhoods when the meeting occurs. By referencing the
map alone, it is clear that these neighborhoods will not qualify for a
road conversion because the required setbacks run into the houses on
multiple lots.

Using GIS for this analysis saved the village time and money by not
requiring engineers to go out in the field and manually measure the
required distances and then map them by hand in the office.

Mapping zoning right of way

Blog_Mappingzoningrightofway.png

The Village of Oak Brook has numerous private roads that are not
maintained by the village. As a result, if a certain neighborhood wants a
road to be converted to a public road they must adhere to village
zoning code.

Two small, adjacent subdivisions in Oak Brook have put in a request
to have their private roads converted to public roads in order to save
money in maintenance fees. The first step that is required is for the
village is to evaluate whether or not these private roads follow village
zoning codes, and if they don’t, then the village must create a plan to
convert these roads to village zoning standards.

In working with the engineering department I was able to create
layers that display the minimum requirements for right of way and
setback sizes. The map displays where the current road is, and the area
that would be required to be converted to village property in order to
adhere to village code.

This map assisted the village by providing them a visual reference to
present these neighborhoods when the meeting occurs. By referencing the
map alone, it is clear that these neighborhoods will not qualify for a
road conversion because the required setbacks run into the houses on
multiple lots.

Using GIS for this analysis saved the village time and money by not
requiring engineers to go out in the field and manually measure the
required distances and then map them by hand in the office.