Monitoring flood levels in MapOffice

Blog_Monitoring_flood_levels_in_MapOffice.png

Last week the GIS Consortium released the ability to display National
Weather Service Advanced Hydrological Prediction Service data for the
region. With a series of clicks real time flooding information can be
displayed in MapOffice™ Advanced for use by decision makers.

Flood Hazard Mapping is an important component for emergency response
in flood-prone areas. Adding flood gauges to MapOffice™ creates an
easily-read, rapidly-accessible charts and maps which facilitates the
administrators and planners to identify areas of risk and prioritize
their mitigation/response efforts. The results were evident when
according to Terrence O’Brien, president of the Metropolitan Water
Reclamation District (MWRD), said that Cook County received an average
rainfall of 4 1/2 inches, "equivalent to over 60 billion gallons of
water." With some areas getting as much as 7 inches on July 23rd.

The water level for the gauge in Riverside is shown above and
illustrates the impact of the event. Going into flooding season this
functionality should streamline flood mitigation planning and response
for local governments.

Monitoring flood levels in MapOffice

Blog_Monitoring_flood_levels_in_MapOffice.png

Last week the GIS Consortium released the ability to display National
Weather Service Advanced Hydrological Prediction Service data for the
region. With a series of clicks real time flooding information can be
displayed in MapOffice™ Advanced for use by decision makers.

Flood Hazard Mapping is an important component for emergency response
in flood-prone areas. Adding flood gauges to MapOffice™ creates an
easily-read, rapidly-accessible charts and maps which facilitates the
administrators and planners to identify areas of risk and prioritize
their mitigation/response efforts. The results were evident when
according to Terrence O’Brien, president of the Metropolitan Water
Reclamation District (MWRD), said that Cook County received an average
rainfall of 4 1/2 inches, "equivalent to over 60 billion gallons of
water." With some areas getting as much as 7 inches on July 23rd.

The water level for the gauge in Riverside is shown above and
illustrates the impact of the event. Going into flooding season this
functionality should streamline flood mitigation planning and response
for local governments.