Planimetric data in Elk Grove Village

​Planimetric data are geographic features captured during a
photogrammetric (airplane fight) mapping process that are flat and
without elevation information to depict the terrain. Such features
include bridges, roadways, building footprints, bodies of water, and
railroad lines. Photogrammetry is the most cost-effective method for
producing this type of mapping information for large areas and these
features typically represent the base data in a map.

As a member of the GIS Consortium Elk Grove Village participates in
an annual data collection process which allows them to obtain such
planimetric data. An advantage for the community is that they receive
cost savings being a part of such a large group contracting these
services. The current service provider for photogrammetric mapping is
Ayres and Associates of Madison, WI. There is a processing and review
procedure for the data to be sure it meets the accuracy standards that
have been established by the GIS Consortium. Generally, all planimetric
features will be within 1.67’ of their actual field location if
collected under the traditional Consortium standards. On occasion the
data collection has had to deviate from those standards due to
circumstances outside of the village’s control. Elk Grove Village
unfortunately falls into this category due to its proximity to O’Hare
International Airport and the flight restrictions they have over and
around the village.

In the spring of 2009 data was collected for Elk Grove Village and
planimetric features for the entire community were delivered, reviewed,
and integrated into the GIS (Geographic Information System) in the fall.
You may have noticed this new data in the MapOffice™ interactive
mapping application http://www.mgpinc.com/MapOffice™/. The alternate
flight height that was available provided for these features to be
within 3.33’ of their actual location which was acceptable and there was
an additional cost savings because this was a less accurate product
compared to the traditional data collection standards.

As mentioned above, this data is usually used to compose a map
presentation, but also provides for impervious surface estimations,
GASB34 statistics, routing, cost estimates for replacement or removal of
infrastructure, and preliminary design or planning.

Planimetric data in Elk Grove Village

​Planimetric data are geographic features captured during a
photogrammetric (airplane fight) mapping process that are flat and
without elevation information to depict the terrain. Such features
include bridges, roadways, building footprints, bodies of water, and
railroad lines. Photogrammetry is the most cost-effective method for
producing this type of mapping information for large areas and these
features typically represent the base data in a map.

As a member of the GIS Consortium Elk Grove Village participates in
an annual data collection process which allows them to obtain such
planimetric data. An advantage for the community is that they receive
cost savings being a part of such a large group contracting these
services. The current service provider for photogrammetric mapping is
Ayres and Associates of Madison, WI. There is a processing and review
procedure for the data to be sure it meets the accuracy standards that
have been established by the GIS Consortium. Generally, all planimetric
features will be within 1.67’ of their actual field location if
collected under the traditional Consortium standards. On occasion the
data collection has had to deviate from those standards due to
circumstances outside of the village’s control. Elk Grove Village
unfortunately falls into this category due to its proximity to O’Hare
International Airport and the flight restrictions they have over and
around the village.

In the spring of 2009 data was collected for Elk Grove Village and
planimetric features for the entire community were delivered, reviewed,
and integrated into the GIS (Geographic Information System) in the fall.
You may have noticed this new data in the MapOffice™ interactive
mapping application http://www.mgpinc.com/MapOffice™/. The alternate
flight height that was available provided for these features to be
within 3.33’ of their actual location which was acceptable and there was
an additional cost savings because this was a less accurate product
compared to the traditional data collection standards.

As mentioned above, this data is usually used to compose a map
presentation, but also provides for impervious surface estimations,
GASB34 statistics, routing, cost estimates for replacement or removal of
infrastructure, and preliminary design or planning.