Second edition of GIS local government cost savings released

​In 2008 the GISC published the document, "Valuing Geographic
Information System (GIS) A Decision Maker’s Perspective" which analyzed
GIS from a cost savings perspective. That is, what cost savings can
accrue to an organization with a GIS program? Cost savings is derived by
comparing business process efficiency in an organization with (and
without) a GIS program. The estimates provided use conservative
assumptions. The results represent a reasonable and supportable basis
for demonstrating cost savings with GIS. The first edition of this
document outlined eight general areas where the introduction of a GIS
could save communities money and improve efficiency. In the second
edition outlines two additional areas for communities to save with the
implementation of a GIS.

The second edition comes to the same conclusion as the first edition,
that GIS saves money, the amount varies by organization. This paper
illustrates that cost savings is directly proportional to the
utilization of the program. The more the system is used the more value
it generates. For this to occur there needs to be a top-down incentive
to utilize the system. This includes maintaining a reliable system and
providing the necessary resources and training to support that system.
In addition to supporting traditional local government processes in a
more efficient automated format, GIS can generate significant cost
savings and value to the organization. The second edition estimates that
GIS can save a small community $67,858 dollars annually and a large
community $274,758 dollars annually.

Second edition of GIS local government cost savings released

​In 2008 the GISC published the document, "Valuing Geographic
Information System (GIS) A Decision Maker’s Perspective" which analyzed
GIS from a cost savings perspective. That is, what cost savings can
accrue to an organization with a GIS program? Cost savings is derived by
comparing business process efficiency in an organization with (and
without) a GIS program. The estimates provided use conservative
assumptions. The results represent a reasonable and supportable basis
for demonstrating cost savings with GIS. The first edition of this
document outlined eight general areas where the introduction of a GIS
could save communities money and improve efficiency. In the second
edition outlines two additional areas for communities to save with the
implementation of a GIS.

The second edition comes to the same conclusion as the first edition,
that GIS saves money, the amount varies by organization. This paper
illustrates that cost savings is directly proportional to the
utilization of the program. The more the system is used the more value
it generates. For this to occur there needs to be a top-down incentive
to utilize the system. This includes maintaining a reliable system and
providing the necessary resources and training to support that system.
In addition to supporting traditional local government processes in a
more efficient automated format, GIS can generate significant cost
savings and value to the organization. The second edition estimates that
GIS can save a small community $67,858 dollars annually and a large
community $274,758 dollars annually.