Tracking annexations

Blog_Tracking_annexations.png

The Village of Lincolnshire and the Geographic Information System
(GIS) Department have been continuously looking for new ways to
incorporate GIS into historical projects that help maintain important
data. An opportunity arose when village personal came to the GIS
Department with a request to update and replace a legacy wall mounted
map showing all village annexations.

The existing map contained all annexation information including
ordinance numbers, dates, number of acres, and extents. The data was
further broken down by decade and displayed on the map accordingly. The
map itself was produced years earlier using Computer-aided Design (CAD)
technology which was no longer available for community use. The
challenge of this project was to get all the information contained on
the map into GIS so we can update and maintain this information going
forward. The process identified involved converting the map into the
GIS environment over a period of time and when complete, all the
important information will be available for mapping, analysis, and
updating.

The conversion of the map was a basic operation, in a sense, which
involved removing the existing wall mounted map and then for GIS
technicians to convert the content from the paper world into the digital
world. Attention was focused on making sure all relevant data was
transferred over and the end product would meet all current future needs
including: data updating and map reproduction. Once the conversion
process was completed a complete review and update cycle were performed
followed by the official replacement of the existing product with the
updated GIS produced product.

In conclusion, it is easy to see how the functionality of GIS within
the community can be beneficial for all parties. It is very important
for both the GIS department and other village departments to continue to
seek out opportunities where they can share important information. GIS
is uniquely positioned to help provide a common platform for data
collection, maintenance, and visualization of geographical information
and this project is a prime example of how existing data from multiple
departments can be shared and used more efficiently.

Tracking annexations

Blog_Tracking_annexations.png

The Village of Lincolnshire and the Geographic Information System
(GIS) Department have been continuously looking for new ways to
incorporate GIS into historical projects that help maintain important
data. An opportunity arose when village personal came to the GIS
Department with a request to update and replace a legacy wall mounted
map showing all village annexations.

The existing map contained all annexation information including
ordinance numbers, dates, number of acres, and extents. The data was
further broken down by decade and displayed on the map accordingly. The
map itself was produced years earlier using Computer-aided Design (CAD)
technology which was no longer available for community use. The
challenge of this project was to get all the information contained on
the map into GIS so we can update and maintain this information going
forward. The process identified involved converting the map into the
GIS environment over a period of time and when complete, all the
important information will be available for mapping, analysis, and
updating.

The conversion of the map was a basic operation, in a sense, which
involved removing the existing wall mounted map and then for GIS
technicians to convert the content from the paper world into the digital
world. Attention was focused on making sure all relevant data was
transferred over and the end product would meet all current future needs
including: data updating and map reproduction. Once the conversion
process was completed a complete review and update cycle were performed
followed by the official replacement of the existing product with the
updated GIS produced product.

In conclusion, it is easy to see how the functionality of GIS within
the community can be beneficial for all parties. It is very important
for both the GIS department and other village departments to continue to
seek out opportunities where they can share important information. GIS
is uniquely positioned to help provide a common platform for data
collection, maintenance, and visualization of geographical information
and this project is a prime example of how existing data from multiple
departments can be shared and used more efficiently.