Tracking benchmark locations

Blog_Trackingbenchmarklocations.png

The Village of Wheeling is currently preparing for the National Flood
Insurance Program Community Rating System (CRS) review. The review
takes into account various aspects of flood prevention infrastructure in
the village and ultimately decides the percentage of savings a resident
receives for flood insurance. One of the important aspects of the
review is a village’s maintenance of a network of surveying benchmarks.
By having a system of maintained benchmarks, surveyors are able to
locate them and depend on their accuracy, while the village receives a
higher score.

For the village to receive credit for Benchmark Maintenance, it must
meet a list of requirements: It must be in the National Spatial
Reference System (NSRS) database or be a permanent monument with key
data readily available to surveyors, such as the village website. There
must be a note that it’s been recovered in the past 5 years and it must
be a first or second order vertical control benchmark. Finally, each
benchmark but have a stability rating of A or B and be within 1 mile of
the community’s regulatory floodplain. In addition to the benchmarks
meeting these requirements, proper documentation is needed, which
includes a map showing the location of each benchmark.

By creating the map documentation for benchmark maintenance in GIS,
the village was able to satisfy multiple requirements with one product. A
series of small maps were created, each representing one of the
benchmarks in the village. In addition, a large overview map was created
showing the location of each benchmark at a large scale. The overview
map was added to the village website, and when a surveyor clicks on a
benchmark on the map, a PDF opens up with the smaller map representing
the information for that specific benchmark. By having this map located
on the village website, it meets the requirements of having it
accessible to surveyors and the public as well as being a document of
each benchmark’s location. By using GIS, the engineering department was
able to create a product that met CRS requirements and was accessible to
the public.

Tracking benchmark locations

Blog_Trackingbenchmarklocations.png

The Village of Wheeling is currently preparing for the National Flood
Insurance Program Community Rating System (CRS) review. The review
takes into account various aspects of flood prevention infrastructure in
the village and ultimately decides the percentage of savings a resident
receives for flood insurance. One of the important aspects of the
review is a village’s maintenance of a network of surveying benchmarks.
By having a system of maintained benchmarks, surveyors are able to
locate them and depend on their accuracy, while the village receives a
higher score.

For the village to receive credit for Benchmark Maintenance, it must
meet a list of requirements: It must be in the National Spatial
Reference System (NSRS) database or be a permanent monument with key
data readily available to surveyors, such as the village website. There
must be a note that it’s been recovered in the past 5 years and it must
be a first or second order vertical control benchmark. Finally, each
benchmark but have a stability rating of A or B and be within 1 mile of
the community’s regulatory floodplain. In addition to the benchmarks
meeting these requirements, proper documentation is needed, which
includes a map showing the location of each benchmark.

By creating the map documentation for benchmark maintenance in GIS,
the village was able to satisfy multiple requirements with one product. A
series of small maps were created, each representing one of the
benchmarks in the village. In addition, a large overview map was created
showing the location of each benchmark at a large scale. The overview
map was added to the village website, and when a surveyor clicks on a
benchmark on the map, a PDF opens up with the smaller map representing
the information for that specific benchmark. By having this map located
on the village website, it meets the requirements of having it
accessible to surveyors and the public as well as being a document of
each benchmark’s location. By using GIS, the engineering department was
able to create a product that met CRS requirements and was accessible to
the public.