Tracking housing demolitions

​Understanding the trends of what is happening in the housing market
is difficult to do especially if you are not in the realty business.
Houses may be sold, rented or even more dramatic, torn down in order to
build a new one. In this article we will focus on the part of the
housing market that at times can have an impact on a local community,
housing demolitions.

Unless you are out driving the streets everyday it may be tough to
locate all of the homes in a community that have been torn down. For
this difficulty alone, it makes analysis a tough thing to do and
investing in permitting software a wise purchase. At the City of Park
Ridge, like many other community governments, they have had a permitting
application in place for many years in order to help them keep track of
important construction operations that require permits. But how do you
analyze all of these records spatially in order to know if there are
any trends in this part of the housing market?

This is where the Geographic Information System (GIS) Department was
able to lend a helping hand. The ability to retrieve records from the
permitting application in the form of an address and knowing what type
of permit was issued (i.e. single family demolition) was a strong step
in the right direction. By having a simple common denominator in the
form of an address allowed the two departments to work with each other
and better yet, allowed these addresses to be displayed spatially on a
map. By using a tool called geocoding, the GIS was able to search a
street centerline data file and locate where an address falls on a
particular street within a specific block. Once these addresses were
converted into a true geographical location they could then be
represented on a map allowing city engineers and building officials to
begin analyzing the trends that are happening on the streets within
their community.

Whether it is flooding do to land grade variations or an excess
amount of water runoff in the sewer system from increased residential
impervious surfaces, housing demolitions may play a role. Without being
able to locate these areas and compare them to other community problems
they simply remain as records in a database rather data that can be
analyzed spatially in relation to other geographical features (i.e.
sewer lines, houses with more green space).

Overall, it is very important for a community to see the big picture
in order to identify where problems have occurred and where new ones may
arise in the future. Moreover, it is also worthy to note how multiple
departments can work together at identifying these problems in the first
place so that they plan more affectively for what be coming on the road
ahead. In this case, the Building Department, Engineering Department
and the GIS Department will all benefit from working together at a
common goal of meeting the needs of the community they serve.

Tracking housing demolitions

​Understanding the trends of what is happening in the housing market
is difficult to do especially if you are not in the realty business.
Houses may be sold, rented or even more dramatic, torn down in order to
build a new one. In this article we will focus on the part of the
housing market that at times can have an impact on a local community,
housing demolitions.

Unless you are out driving the streets everyday it may be tough to
locate all of the homes in a community that have been torn down. For
this difficulty alone, it makes analysis a tough thing to do and
investing in permitting software a wise purchase. At the City of Park
Ridge, like many other community governments, they have had a permitting
application in place for many years in order to help them keep track of
important construction operations that require permits. But how do you
analyze all of these records spatially in order to know if there are
any trends in this part of the housing market?

This is where the Geographic Information System (GIS) Department was
able to lend a helping hand. The ability to retrieve records from the
permitting application in the form of an address and knowing what type
of permit was issued (i.e. single family demolition) was a strong step
in the right direction. By having a simple common denominator in the
form of an address allowed the two departments to work with each other
and better yet, allowed these addresses to be displayed spatially on a
map. By using a tool called geocoding, the GIS was able to search a
street centerline data file and locate where an address falls on a
particular street within a specific block. Once these addresses were
converted into a true geographical location they could then be
represented on a map allowing city engineers and building officials to
begin analyzing the trends that are happening on the streets within
their community.

Whether it is flooding do to land grade variations or an excess
amount of water runoff in the sewer system from increased residential
impervious surfaces, housing demolitions may play a role. Without being
able to locate these areas and compare them to other community problems
they simply remain as records in a database rather data that can be
analyzed spatially in relation to other geographical features (i.e.
sewer lines, houses with more green space).

Overall, it is very important for a community to see the big picture
in order to identify where problems have occurred and where new ones may
arise in the future. Moreover, it is also worthy to note how multiple
departments can work together at identifying these problems in the first
place so that they plan more affectively for what be coming on the road
ahead. In this case, the Building Department, Engineering Department
and the GIS Department will all benefit from working together at a
common goal of meeting the needs of the community they serve.