Tree preservation using GIS

Blog_TreepreservationusingGIS.png

A developing problem spread among many communities in the greater
Chicago area is the rapid growth of the Emerald Ash Borer, which is an
insect that adversely affects the health of ash trees. Oak Brook has
recently began locating and tracking all ash trees in the village owned
public parkways, and noting any trees that are currently affected by the
outbreak. It is important to not only know which trees are infected,
but also to know where all non-infected trees are located so that
mitigation can begin immediately. The village has a plan to completely
replace all ash trees within the next 10 years, beginning with the trees
that are currently in the worse condition. It is important to track
and maintain the ash trees because subdivisions with a high density of
ash trees could face mass amounts of landscape change in a very short
period of time, which could leave the esthetics of the subdivision less
than pleasing.

The image shown is of the ash tree locations within the Saddle Brook
neighborhood, which has a very high density of ash trees in the public
parkway. An inventory of trees was done by public works employees and
the results were returned in order to track and analyze the data using
GIS. Currently we are tracking ash trees, infected ash trees, and ash
trees that have been replaced in the past few years. By using GIS we
will be able to track high priority areas, plan for future mitigation
and keep track of the areas and work that has already been implemented.

Tree preservation using GIS

Blog_TreepreservationusingGIS.png

A developing problem spread among many communities in the greater
Chicago area is the rapid growth of the Emerald Ash Borer, which is an
insect that adversely affects the health of ash trees. Oak Brook has
recently began locating and tracking all ash trees in the village owned
public parkways, and noting any trees that are currently affected by the
outbreak. It is important to not only know which trees are infected,
but also to know where all non-infected trees are located so that
mitigation can begin immediately. The village has a plan to completely
replace all ash trees within the next 10 years, beginning with the trees
that are currently in the worse condition. It is important to track
and maintain the ash trees because subdivisions with a high density of
ash trees could face mass amounts of landscape change in a very short
period of time, which could leave the esthetics of the subdivision less
than pleasing.

The image shown is of the ash tree locations within the Saddle Brook
neighborhood, which has a very high density of ash trees in the public
parkway. An inventory of trees was done by public works employees and
the results were returned in order to track and analyze the data using
GIS. Currently we are tracking ash trees, infected ash trees, and ash
trees that have been replaced in the past few years. By using GIS we
will be able to track high priority areas, plan for future mitigation
and keep track of the areas and work that has already been implemented.