Using GIS for sound analysis

Blog_UsingGISforsoundanalysis.png

The Village of Oak Brook has recently begun receiving noise
complaints from a couple of apartment complexes northeast of the Oak
Brook promenade. The complainants allege that the noise is the result of
music being played from a bar facing in their direction. As a result
the village must do analysis to figure out where the noise is actually
coming from, and whether or not they are not complying with the noise
ordinance set by the Village.

In an effort to make this process quick and easy, community
development decided to use GIS to gather distances from the origin of
the noise to various buildings around the area, including the apartment
complexes filing the noise complaints. By using GIS, community
development was able to get distances to each of the chosen buildings,
along with a map displaying all of the data. Rather than going into the
field and manually doing the measurements, GIS was able to produce the
map in much less time, with less man power and a high percentage of
accuracy. Additionally the maps and data will be stored for future
analysis that may occur, involving decibel levels at the complainant’s
residence in comparison to closer buildings and residences. The image
displayed is the map that was initially made for the first step of the
analysis.

Using GIS for sound analysis

Blog_UsingGISforsoundanalysis.png

The Village of Oak Brook has recently begun receiving noise
complaints from a couple of apartment complexes northeast of the Oak
Brook promenade. The complainants allege that the noise is the result of
music being played from a bar facing in their direction. As a result
the village must do analysis to figure out where the noise is actually
coming from, and whether or not they are not complying with the noise
ordinance set by the Village.

In an effort to make this process quick and easy, community
development decided to use GIS to gather distances from the origin of
the noise to various buildings around the area, including the apartment
complexes filing the noise complaints. By using GIS, community
development was able to get distances to each of the chosen buildings,
along with a map displaying all of the data. Rather than going into the
field and manually doing the measurements, GIS was able to produce the
map in much less time, with less man power and a high percentage of
accuracy. Additionally the maps and data will be stored for future
analysis that may occur, involving decibel levels at the complainant’s
residence in comparison to closer buildings and residences. The image
displayed is the map that was initially made for the first step of the
analysis.