Using GIS to Analyze U.S. Census Data

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It is pretty amazing to think of all the information that has been
collected and stored in the past few years by the U.S. Census Bureau.
The last major data delivery that was published by the U.S. Census
Bureau was in the year 2000 and although that information was useful, it
soon became a question of accuracy as time drove on. This year the
U.S. Census Bureau has been delivering a large set of new data, much of
it coming in the form of database tables and Excel spreadsheets and
other sets arriving as Geographical Information System (GIS) data
layers.

Other things that have changed since 2000 are the amount of local
government entities that have invested in GIS technology. Tasks that
might once be a bit difficult have now become easier thanks to help from
the GIS. One example of this was the use by the Village of Morton
Grove, IL and its need to use 2010 U.S. Census Bureau data in order to
determine populations within one, three and five mile radiuses from the
village’s corporate limits. This information, once compiled, would be
used on advertisement flyer to help draw businesses to move into town.
For a new business looking to succeed, they will most likely be
concerned without the amount of people they may be able to bring in on a
daily basis.

By viewing the 2010 U.S. Census Bureau data layers in GIS,
information about specific populations can be derived from the block or
block group information. Additionally, simple GIS tools can be used to
create buffer distances at one, three and five mile radiuses from the
village’s corporate limits. Once you have these two sets of
information, some simple analysis can be done to extract the amount of
population that resides within each buffer area. A once complex task
now simplified thanks to GIS and the U.S. Census Bureau.

Using GIS to Analyze U.S. Census Data

Blog_UsingGIStoAnalyzeUSCensusData.png

It is pretty amazing to think of all the information that has been
collected and stored in the past few years by the U.S. Census Bureau.
The last major data delivery that was published by the U.S. Census
Bureau was in the year 2000 and although that information was useful, it
soon became a question of accuracy as time drove on. This year the
U.S. Census Bureau has been delivering a large set of new data, much of
it coming in the form of database tables and Excel spreadsheets and
other sets arriving as Geographical Information System (GIS) data
layers.

Other things that have changed since 2000 are the amount of local
government entities that have invested in GIS technology. Tasks that
might once be a bit difficult have now become easier thanks to help from
the GIS. One example of this was the use by the Village of Morton
Grove, IL and its need to use 2010 U.S. Census Bureau data in order to
determine populations within one, three and five mile radiuses from the
village’s corporate limits. This information, once compiled, would be
used on advertisement flyer to help draw businesses to move into town.
For a new business looking to succeed, they will most likely be
concerned without the amount of people they may be able to bring in on a
daily basis.

By viewing the 2010 U.S. Census Bureau data layers in GIS,
information about specific populations can be derived from the block or
block group information. Additionally, simple GIS tools can be used to
create buffer distances at one, three and five mile radiuses from the
village’s corporate limits. Once you have these two sets of
information, some simple analysis can be done to extract the amount of
population that resides within each buffer area. A once complex task
now simplified thanks to GIS and the U.S. Census Bureau.