Using GIS to estimate impervious surface area

Blog_UsingGIStoestimateimpervioussurfacearea.png

Impervious surfaces are typically artificial structures, such as
roads, sidewalks, driveways, etc… that are covered by in impenetrable
materials like asphalt, concrete, and rooftops. These surfaces can
become environmental concerns because they eliminate rainwater
infiltration and groundwater recharge, resulting in a significant impact
on flooding. The Village of Wheeling calculates the impervious surface
area for each parcel whenever there is a plan for new construction. If
any amount of new impervious surface area is planned, an equivalent
amount of water retention area has to be created. Typically, the
Village engineers would make these calculations by measuring the
impervious surface area using engineering drawings. This process can
take a significant amount of time and effort to get an accurate
measurement. The Engineering department requested that something be
created that would allow them to quickly get amount of impervious
surface for each lot in the Village.

To create an impervious surface area, existing base data such as
roads, driveways, sidewalks, and buildings were combined to form one
impervious surface area feature. This feature was then clipped by the
Village lot lines to separate the impervious surface area by each lot.
The amount of impervious and pervious surface area was then calculated
for each lot by comparing it to the overall square footage. By
combining all the data and then doing one mass calculation, the
engineering department does not have to spend time calculating each lot
by hand. By using GIS, the engineering department can reference the
calculations faster and with more accuracy.

Using GIS to estimate impervious surface area

Blog_UsingGIStoestimateimpervioussurfacearea.png

Impervious surfaces are typically artificial structures, such as
roads, sidewalks, driveways, etc… that are covered by in impenetrable
materials like asphalt, concrete, and rooftops. These surfaces can
become environmental concerns because they eliminate rainwater
infiltration and groundwater recharge, resulting in a significant impact
on flooding. The Village of Wheeling calculates the impervious surface
area for each parcel whenever there is a plan for new construction. If
any amount of new impervious surface area is planned, an equivalent
amount of water retention area has to be created. Typically, the
Village engineers would make these calculations by measuring the
impervious surface area using engineering drawings. This process can
take a significant amount of time and effort to get an accurate
measurement. The Engineering department requested that something be
created that would allow them to quickly get amount of impervious
surface for each lot in the Village.

To create an impervious surface area, existing base data such as
roads, driveways, sidewalks, and buildings were combined to form one
impervious surface area feature. This feature was then clipped by the
Village lot lines to separate the impervious surface area by each lot.
The amount of impervious and pervious surface area was then calculated
for each lot by comparing it to the overall square footage. By
combining all the data and then doing one mass calculation, the
engineering department does not have to spend time calculating each lot
by hand. By using GIS, the engineering department can reference the
calculations faster and with more accuracy.