Using Permitting Data to Identify Areas for Update Mapping

Blog_UsingPermittingData.png

Every year the City contracts with Ayres Associates to update a
portion of their base mapping. This is an important part of the process
to ensure base mapping reflects real world conditions. An easy way to
identify update areas is to look at the when areas were last updated
and select the lowest year. This method will select areas of older
data but does not necessarily select the areas of greatest change. For
example business districts have a higher rate of demolition and new
constriction, than do established residential neighborhoods.

The City determined it was more valuable to remap areas of greater
change as opposed to areas of older data. For example, it does not
really matter if data in a Golf Course area is older because Golf
Courses do not change much over time. To determine the areas of
greatest change, the GIS Office retrieved permit data from the Tyler
Eden application. Permits data related to demolition, new construction,
or alterations to existing features were mapped.

The city used the groupings of these permit locations to determine
which areas of older mapping areas should be updated. It became obvious
that several areas of the 2005 mapping area, should be updated in t he
2011 update cycle. Thus the City will maximize the value of it’s update
mapping by ensuring the areas with the most changes are being updated.​

Using Permitting Data to Identify Areas for Update Mapping

Blog_UsingPermittingData.png

Every year the City contracts with Ayres Associates to update a
portion of their base mapping. This is an important part of the process
to ensure base mapping reflects real world conditions. An easy way to
identify update areas is to look at the when areas were last updated
and select the lowest year. This method will select areas of older
data but does not necessarily select the areas of greatest change. For
example business districts have a higher rate of demolition and new
constriction, than do established residential neighborhoods.

The City determined it was more valuable to remap areas of greater
change as opposed to areas of older data. For example, it does not
really matter if data in a Golf Course area is older because Golf
Courses do not change much over time. To determine the areas of
greatest change, the GIS Office retrieved permit data from the Tyler
Eden application. Permits data related to demolition, new construction,
or alterations to existing features were mapped.

The city used the groupings of these permit locations to determine
which areas of older mapping areas should be updated. It became obvious
that several areas of the 2005 mapping area, should be updated in t he
2011 update cycle. Thus the City will maximize the value of it’s update
mapping by ensuring the areas with the most changes are being updated.​