Water System Compliance Tracking

​In an effort to maintain and enforce a standard of quality water
treatment and distribution amongst local governments, the EPA requires
municipalities to provide a map displaying their water system monitoring
stations. Specifically, the EPA requires a map displaying the water
distribution system along with: coliform sites, booster chlorination
stations, pressure zones, storage tanks, entry points, water sources,
and stage 2 sampling sites. The map is not only used by the EPA to
locate these sites, but it is also used by the village’s water
department when determining the best areas to setup sampling sites.
Because the EPA prefers samples from areas along the water system that
aren’t used as much, the map gives the water department a visual aid
while determining which areas of the system are least exercised.

The water department asked this map to me made with GIS because of
its ability to not only create maps, but store the spatial data so that
it can be referenced again in the future. Because most of the required
information is already stored within the Village’s GIS data, all that
was needed was to plot the new testing locations onto the map. The
village was able to save a lot of time, money and resources by already
tracking the water system in GIS because this map is mandatory and would
have had to been created by another means which would not have been as
time and cost efficient. In addition to being able to quickly create
the map on short notice, the Village will also be able to quickly make
any changes to this map when the information is requested again next
year by the EPA.

Water System Compliance Tracking

​In an effort to maintain and enforce a standard of quality water
treatment and distribution amongst local governments, the EPA requires
municipalities to provide a map displaying their water system monitoring
stations. Specifically, the EPA requires a map displaying the water
distribution system along with: coliform sites, booster chlorination
stations, pressure zones, storage tanks, entry points, water sources,
and stage 2 sampling sites. The map is not only used by the EPA to
locate these sites, but it is also used by the village’s water
department when determining the best areas to setup sampling sites.
Because the EPA prefers samples from areas along the water system that
aren’t used as much, the map gives the water department a visual aid
while determining which areas of the system are least exercised.

The water department asked this map to me made with GIS because of
its ability to not only create maps, but store the spatial data so that
it can be referenced again in the future. Because most of the required
information is already stored within the Village’s GIS data, all that
was needed was to plot the new testing locations onto the map. The
village was able to save a lot of time, money and resources by already
tracking the water system in GIS because this map is mandatory and would
have had to been created by another means which would not have been as
time and cost efficient. In addition to being able to quickly create
the map on short notice, the Village will also be able to quickly make
any changes to this map when the information is requested again next
year by the EPA.