What is GIS?

​Nearly everything in life is related to location. Whether you are
looking for a new job closer to home, a beach vacation or your set of
missing car keys, everything is correlated to space and location.
Geography is heavily associated with location and in recent history has
become a staple in people’s everyday workflow. Google Maps StreetView,
Bing Bird’s Eye View, MapQuest, and other mapping sites have created a
niche in mainstream America that allows people to access geographic
information (street names, directions, aerial photography) at the push
of a button. This is the basis of Geographic Information System (GIS).

GIS creates an environment that harnesses geographic and tabular data
and combines them to better understand the information. This is
especially important in local government with its defined boundaries,
parcels, ordinances, signage and infrastructure. Paper maps and plans
become digital and easier to consume and share via the internet or by
electronic document. GIS also has the framework to be a centralized data
center and can be incorporated by every department in a useful manner.
With data consumption increasing at an exponential rate, the need to
associate data with a geographic feature has increased as well. Whether
it is crimes on a certain street, creating a mailing list within 500
feet of a certain address, or showing the direction of flow for a sewer
line, GIS can create a better understanding of the spatial environment
surrounding the decision makers. GIS is spatial technology. GIS is
location.

What is GIS?

​Nearly everything in life is related to location. Whether you are
looking for a new job closer to home, a beach vacation or your set of
missing car keys, everything is correlated to space and location.
Geography is heavily associated with location and in recent history has
become a staple in people’s everyday workflow. Google Maps StreetView,
Bing Bird’s Eye View, MapQuest, and other mapping sites have created a
niche in mainstream America that allows people to access geographic
information (street names, directions, aerial photography) at the push
of a button. This is the basis of Geographic Information System (GIS).

GIS creates an environment that harnesses geographic and tabular data
and combines them to better understand the information. This is
especially important in local government with its defined boundaries,
parcels, ordinances, signage and infrastructure. Paper maps and plans
become digital and easier to consume and share via the internet or by
electronic document. GIS also has the framework to be a centralized data
center and can be incorporated by every department in a useful manner.
With data consumption increasing at an exponential rate, the need to
associate data with a geographic feature has increased as well. Whether
it is crimes on a certain street, creating a mailing list within 500
feet of a certain address, or showing the direction of flow for a sewer
line, GIS can create a better understanding of the spatial environment
surrounding the decision makers. GIS is spatial technology. GIS is
location.