MapOffice public deployed to Lake Forest employees and residents

Blog_MapOffice_public_deployed_to_Lake_Forest.png

Lake Forest will have access to the web version of MapOffice™
beginning June 1st. The month of May was spent preparing the base data
needed to get MapOffice™ up and running, which involved loading previous
GIS data into the GIS Consortium standardized database.

MapOffice™ will provide staff and residents with information for each
parcel and address in the city, which ranges from school districts and
voting information to garbage pick up days. A link to the Lake County
Assessor’s website for each individual address is also provided to gain
further information regarding building and property dimensions, assessed
value, and sales history.  Tools will be available to the user to
provide further analysis if needed, such as measuring and links to both
Google Street View and Bing Maps Bird’s Eye View.

Information commonly used by staff to assist residents will now all
be available in one place, increasing efficiency, as well as providing
basic information to residents who may have otherwise had to call in to
ask about in the past. Work continues on data creation for MapOffice™
Advanced, which is scheduled to be available on the City intranet by
mid-June.

MapOffice public deployed to Lake Forest employees and residents

Blog_MapOffice_public_deployed_to_Lake_Forest.png

Lake Forest will have access to the web version of MapOffice™
beginning June 1st. The month of May was spent preparing the base data
needed to get MapOffice™ up and running, which involved loading previous
GIS data into the GIS Consortium standardized database.

MapOffice™ will provide staff and residents with information for each
parcel and address in the city, which ranges from school districts and
voting information to garbage pick up days. A link to the Lake County
Assessor’s website for each individual address is also provided to gain
further information regarding building and property dimensions, assessed
value, and sales history.  Tools will be available to the user to
provide further analysis if needed, such as measuring and links to both
Google Street View and Bing Maps Bird’s Eye View.

Information commonly used by staff to assist residents will now all
be available in one place, increasing efficiency, as well as providing
basic information to residents who may have otherwise had to call in to
ask about in the past. Work continues on data creation for MapOffice™
Advanced, which is scheduled to be available on the City intranet by
mid-June.

Repetitive loss recovery

Blog_Repetitive_loss_recovery.jpg

FEMA defines an area of repetitive loss as: "a property for which two
or more claims of more than $1,000 have been paid by the National Flood
Insurance Program (NFIP) within any 10 – year period since 1978." The
properties only represent 1% of all of NFIP’s insurance policies, but
have accounted for nearly one-third of the claim payments. FEMA provides
all repetitive loss information to every community each year and if a
community wishes to participate in the Community Rating System (CRS)
program, then they must map out each area and property and submit the
maps to FEMA.

The Village of Wheeling participates in the CRS program and has a
number of repetitive loss properties. Because of this, the GIS
department was asked to put together maps showing the locations of all
repetitive loss properties in the village. Each map shows the location
of the repetitive loss area with repetitive loss properties highlighted.
Each affected property lists the dates for each flood insurance claim.
By mapping out the locations of each property, the village meets the
requirements set by FEMA for documenting repetitive loss areas and for
participating in the CRS insurance program, therefore allowing it’s
resident’s to obtain a better price for flood insurance.

Repetitive loss recovery

Blog_Repetitive_loss_recovery.jpg

FEMA defines an area of repetitive loss as: "a property for which two
or more claims of more than $1,000 have been paid by the National Flood
Insurance Program (NFIP) within any 10 – year period since 1978." The
properties only represent 1% of all of NFIP’s insurance policies, but
have accounted for nearly one-third of the claim payments. FEMA provides
all repetitive loss information to every community each year and if a
community wishes to participate in the Community Rating System (CRS)
program, then they must map out each area and property and submit the
maps to FEMA.

The Village of Wheeling participates in the CRS program and has a
number of repetitive loss properties. Because of this, the GIS
department was asked to put together maps showing the locations of all
repetitive loss properties in the village. Each map shows the location
of the repetitive loss area with repetitive loss properties highlighted.
Each affected property lists the dates for each flood insurance claim.
By mapping out the locations of each property, the village meets the
requirements set by FEMA for documenting repetitive loss areas and for
participating in the CRS insurance program, therefore allowing it’s
resident’s to obtain a better price for flood insurance.

Capital improvement residential mailings

Blog_Capital_improvement_residential_mailings.png

Every year the Village of Oak Brook performs improvements on roads,
water main and infrastructure as a part of their capital improvement
program. Prior to the improvements starting, the village is required to
notify all residents that are directly and indirectly impacted by the
improvements.

In the past, the village scanned and copied a paper village address
map to highlight the addresses affected by the improvements. This proved
to be a tedious task as maps had to be created for each address. In
order to make this process run more smoothly, the Village asked for the
help of the GIS department.

Through the use of GIS, maps highlighting the addresses impacted by
the improvements were created. Residents that were primarily and
secondarily affected by the improvements were shown in different colors
with their address number and the latest aerial imagery. Residents that
were primarily affected were those address located adjacent to the
improvement site. Residents that lived in the general area of the
improvement site were classified as secondary. For 2010, residential
mailings have been sent for the paving, water main and crack sealing
projects.

Capital improvement residential mailings

Blog_Capital_improvement_residential_mailings.png

Every year the Village of Oak Brook performs improvements on roads,
water main and infrastructure as a part of their capital improvement
program. Prior to the improvements starting, the village is required to
notify all residents that are directly and indirectly impacted by the
improvements.

In the past, the village scanned and copied a paper village address
map to highlight the addresses affected by the improvements. This proved
to be a tedious task as maps had to be created for each address. In
order to make this process run more smoothly, the Village asked for the
help of the GIS department.

Through the use of GIS, maps highlighting the addresses impacted by
the improvements were created. Residents that were primarily and
secondarily affected by the improvements were shown in different colors
with their address number and the latest aerial imagery. Residents that
were primarily affected were those address located adjacent to the
improvement site. Residents that lived in the general area of the
improvement site were classified as secondary. For 2010, residential
mailings have been sent for the paving, water main and crack sealing
projects.

Traffic accident analysis

Blog_Traffic_accident_analysis.jpgThe Vi​llage of Norridge has begun mapping out traffic accident
information in an effort to try and limit the amount of accidents in
high traffic areas and understand why accidents occur in low traffic
areas. A map was created using data provided by the police department
detailing the locations of traffic accidents by month. Accident
locations were added to the map and categorized by type (property
damage, personal injury, village property, fatality). Eventually, as
data from previous months is added to the database, patterns will begin
to emerge.

By mapping the location of each accident from month to month,
patterns can begin to emerge and provide the police department and
engineering with a visual representation of the accidents. The locations
can then be analyzed to see if there is as abnormal amount of accidents
in low traffic areas. The village engineering department can then
analyze these locations against village data, such as the sign
inventory, to determine if there is a specific cause for those
accidents. By using GIS to map out traffic accident locations, the
Village of Norridge can have a better understanding on where the
accidents occur in the village and give them a first step in determining
why they are happening.

Traffic accident analysis

Blog_Traffic_accident_analysis.jpgThe Vi​llage of Norridge has begun mapping out traffic accident
information in an effort to try and limit the amount of accidents in
high traffic areas and understand why accidents occur in low traffic
areas. A map was created using data provided by the police department
detailing the locations of traffic accidents by month. Accident
locations were added to the map and categorized by type (property
damage, personal injury, village property, fatality). Eventually, as
data from previous months is added to the database, patterns will begin
to emerge.

By mapping the location of each accident from month to month,
patterns can begin to emerge and provide the police department and
engineering with a visual representation of the accidents. The locations
can then be analyzed to see if there is as abnormal amount of accidents
in low traffic areas. The village engineering department can then
analyze these locations against village data, such as the sign
inventory, to determine if there is a specific cause for those
accidents. By using GIS to map out traffic accident locations, the
Village of Norridge can have a better understanding on where the
accidents occur in the village and give them a first step in determining
why they are happening.

Using existing CAD data for cartographic mapping

Blog_Using_existing_CAD _data.png

One of the disadvantages that may arise while creating an informative
map is the amount of time it can take to create new data where it does
not previously exist. But what if that data already existed in a format
that you could use? The advantage of using a Geographic Information
System (GIS) for mapping is the system’s versatility to handle the other
formats of data, which in the end can save the user a lot of time and
money.

For the Village of Morton Grove, the ability to use a Computer Aided
Design (CAD) drawing within GIS meant that the village could take
existing data from the consultant and use it in-house to create the maps
that they desired for their Dempster Streetscape plans. Once the CAD
data was received by the village, it was then imported into GIS,
rectified to fit the correct geographical location and subsequently used
like any other data layer already in the map. This approach was much
more efficient because it turned the control over to the village as well
as removed the time that would be wasted calling the consultant every
time a small adjustment needed to be made to the map. In addition, the
end map product reflected a custom design that the village knew would be
relatable to their residents when they reviewed the map at the Dempster
Street Improvement open-house.

It is not always easy to obtain CAD data from a consultant, but if a
digital drawing is accessible it is well worth the time to request it,
use it and in the end, benefit from the time and money you save by not
creating data that could be considered redundant.

Using existing CAD data for cartographic mapping

Blog_Using_existing_CAD _data.png

One of the disadvantages that may arise while creating an informative
map is the amount of time it can take to create new data where it does
not previously exist. But what if that data already existed in a format
that you could use? The advantage of using a Geographic Information
System (GIS) for mapping is the system’s versatility to handle the other
formats of data, which in the end can save the user a lot of time and
money.

For the Village of Morton Grove, the ability to use a Computer Aided
Design (CAD) drawing within GIS meant that the village could take
existing data from the consultant and use it in-house to create the maps
that they desired for their Dempster Streetscape plans. Once the CAD
data was received by the village, it was then imported into GIS,
rectified to fit the correct geographical location and subsequently used
like any other data layer already in the map. This approach was much
more efficient because it turned the control over to the village as well
as removed the time that would be wasted calling the consultant every
time a small adjustment needed to be made to the map. In addition, the
end map product reflected a custom design that the village knew would be
relatable to their residents when they reviewed the map at the Dempster
Street Improvement open-house.

It is not always easy to obtain CAD data from a consultant, but if a
digital drawing is accessible it is well worth the time to request it,
use it and in the end, benefit from the time and money you save by not
creating data that could be considered redundant.