GIS Offers New Tools to Water Department

The Village of Lincolnwood’s Geographic Information System (GIS) team
has been hard at work developing tools to increase productivity and
simplify employee’s workflows related to geographic data. Through
MapOffice™ Advanced, a customized web mapping application, Village
employees have many tools aimed at extracting tabular data using
geographic contents.

The latest is the Water Main Isolation Tool, is aimed at providing
Village water maintenance crews the ability to find all water valves
connected to a section of water main. Water crews can now simply click
on a water main and find all connected valves eliminating field work and
research. This in turn will save not only time, but also water during a
main break which can become very problematic during the winter months.

In addition to showing connected valves, the tool documents affected
water hydrants, which have importance if a fire were to break out in the
vicinity during a main break. Village water crews are very excited to
use this new tool as they had said many good things during a
demonstration last week. New tools are routinely published in MapOffice™
Advanced on a monthly basis.

GIS Offers New Tools to Water Department

The Village of Lincolnwood’s Geographic Information System (GIS) team
has been hard at work developing tools to increase productivity and
simplify employee’s workflows related to geographic data. Through
MapOffice™ Advanced, a customized web mapping application, Village
employees have many tools aimed at extracting tabular data using
geographic contents.

The latest is the Water Main Isolation Tool, is aimed at providing
Village water maintenance crews the ability to find all water valves
connected to a section of water main. Water crews can now simply click
on a water main and find all connected valves eliminating field work and
research. This in turn will save not only time, but also water during a
main break which can become very problematic during the winter months.

In addition to showing connected valves, the tool documents affected
water hydrants, which have importance if a fire were to break out in the
vicinity during a main break. Village water crews are very excited to
use this new tool as they had said many good things during a
demonstration last week. New tools are routinely published in MapOffice™
Advanced on a monthly basis.

Firework Fallout Locations Map

Blog_Firework_Fallout_Locations_Map.jpg

A recent development in the Glenview Geographic Information System
(GIS) has been the creation of the firework fallout locations for the
Fire Department. The information created includes the site locations and
the fallout buffers for each location. Fallouts are determined by the
size of the shell, and a one inch shell has a radius or fallout of 70
feet.

The Fallout map is available for the Fire Department and or all
Village staff at any time through GIS or the PDF map folder which is
located in the all employee accessible directory. This data provides an
excellent resource for quickly referencing site locations and assisting
with or containing any potential fallout related fires or problems.

Firework Fallout Locations Map

Blog_Firework_Fallout_Locations_Map.jpg

A recent development in the Glenview Geographic Information System
(GIS) has been the creation of the firework fallout locations for the
Fire Department. The information created includes the site locations and
the fallout buffers for each location. Fallouts are determined by the
size of the shell, and a one inch shell has a radius or fallout of 70
feet.

The Fallout map is available for the Fire Department and or all
Village staff at any time through GIS or the PDF map folder which is
located in the all employee accessible directory. This data provides an
excellent resource for quickly referencing site locations and assisting
with or containing any potential fallout related fires or problems.

Police beat evaluation

Blog_Police_beat_evaluation.jpg

A recent initiative for the Elk Grove Village Geographic Information
System (GIS) has been the creation of police beat and sub beat
information including coordination with the Northwest Central Dispatch
Center who manages the Village’s emergency calls.

A desire of the Elk Grove Village Police Department is to better
understand the dynamics of workload throughout the village and if
certain areas could benefit from increased or an adjustment of patrol
units. To realize the demand of the beats and sub beats the GIS was used
to calculate statistics for 2008 and 2009 calls for service.
Summarizing statistics by beat which as of now are generally defined by
certain zoning types allows for an understanding of overall police
activity. Further analysis by time of day showed which shifts are the
busiest as well.

This information will provide a decision support tool as a
restructure of beats is considered and can begin without interruption to
dispatch services by testing dispatch changes along existing beat
boundaries. Additional investigation of the data may suggest that
patterns exist at even smaller time ranges which would suggest a shift
of patrol at certain times of day or that certain types of incidents
occur more often in some areas and result in a longer period of time at
those types of calls.

After making use of these types of analysis it will be determined
which are the most influential factors to determine patrol needs and can
continue to be performed over time to validate trends and truly
understand the policing demands.

Police beat evaluation

Blog_Police_beat_evaluation.jpg

A recent initiative for the Elk Grove Village Geographic Information
System (GIS) has been the creation of police beat and sub beat
information including coordination with the Northwest Central Dispatch
Center who manages the Village’s emergency calls.

A desire of the Elk Grove Village Police Department is to better
understand the dynamics of workload throughout the village and if
certain areas could benefit from increased or an adjustment of patrol
units. To realize the demand of the beats and sub beats the GIS was used
to calculate statistics for 2008 and 2009 calls for service.
Summarizing statistics by beat which as of now are generally defined by
certain zoning types allows for an understanding of overall police
activity. Further analysis by time of day showed which shifts are the
busiest as well.

This information will provide a decision support tool as a
restructure of beats is considered and can begin without interruption to
dispatch services by testing dispatch changes along existing beat
boundaries. Additional investigation of the data may suggest that
patterns exist at even smaller time ranges which would suggest a shift
of patrol at certain times of day or that certain types of incidents
occur more often in some areas and result in a longer period of time at
those types of calls.

After making use of these types of analysis it will be determined
which are the most influential factors to determine patrol needs and can
continue to be performed over time to validate trends and truly
understand the policing demands.

Review Liquor License Application Submission

Blog_Review_Liquor_License_Application_Submission.png

Every now and again a municipality is faced with the decision on
whether or not to allow a new establishment the rights to sell liquor.
Many questions are raised on where this potential establishment will be
located as well as how late this establishment will stay open. The City
of Park Ridge was recently confronted with these questions and had to
make a decision on whether or not to allow an establishment these
rights. Within their decision making process they decided to use the
Geographic Information System (GIS) as a method for how this late night
establishment might affect the local residential neighborhoods.

Considering the city already maintains a zoning map annually, the
only part left to do was to give a geographic location to all liquor
license locations as well as apply a one thousand foot buffer distance
to each location as a guide to how many residents might be affected
within this distance from the proposed establishment location. If the
buffer area of the proposed establishment location affected more
residential homes than the other existing liquor license locations, the
site may not be considered as optimal and thus may not pass.

Although GIS would not be making the final decision on whether this
establishment would be allowed, the ability to map out all existing
liquor license locations and their proximity to areas zoned as
residential was quite valuable as well as an efficient use of existing
data.

Review Liquor License Application Submission

Blog_Review_Liquor_License_Application_Submission.png

Every now and again a municipality is faced with the decision on
whether or not to allow a new establishment the rights to sell liquor.
Many questions are raised on where this potential establishment will be
located as well as how late this establishment will stay open. The City
of Park Ridge was recently confronted with these questions and had to
make a decision on whether or not to allow an establishment these
rights. Within their decision making process they decided to use the
Geographic Information System (GIS) as a method for how this late night
establishment might affect the local residential neighborhoods.

Considering the city already maintains a zoning map annually, the
only part left to do was to give a geographic location to all liquor
license locations as well as apply a one thousand foot buffer distance
to each location as a guide to how many residents might be affected
within this distance from the proposed establishment location. If the
buffer area of the proposed establishment location affected more
residential homes than the other existing liquor license locations, the
site may not be considered as optimal and thus may not pass.

Although GIS would not be making the final decision on whether this
establishment would be allowed, the ability to map out all existing
liquor license locations and their proximity to areas zoned as
residential was quite valuable as well as an efficient use of existing
data.

GIS used to evaluate Special Service Area

Blog_GIS_used_to_evaluate_Special_Service_Area.png

The Special Service Area 16 came up for it’s first three year review
in the Spring of 2010. The City Manager required methods to determine if
the Special Service Area had fulfilled it’s goal of maintaining an
economically vibrant downtown. He decided that a study of the location
units used for retail, services, office, and vacant units would supply
the required information

The first part of the project was joint field survey conducted by
Engineering and Community Development to determine the first floor uses
of each building within the Special Service Area. They walked the
entirety of the Special Service Area and record the use of each
commercial unit. The survey results were entered into an Excel
spreadsheet and given to the GIS Office.

The GIS office reviewed the survey and quickly realized that many
buildings have multiple businesses associated with them. Therefore, it
was decide to split the buildings into appropriate units and assign the
business information to each unit. These units were categorized by
commercial use to create three final products, Retail Map, Service and
Office Map. The Director of Community Development reviewed the maps and
then GIS Office submitted to the City Manger.

By using GIS, the city was able to create maps that showed specific
economic activity within the Special Service Area. For example, clusters
of vacant and retail-orientated business were found on the maps. These
maps are helping the City Manager to make the case that the Special
Service Area is successful in maintaining the economic vitality of the
Central Business District.

GIS used to evaluate Special Service Area

Blog_GIS_used_to_evaluate_Special_Service_Area.png

The Special Service Area 16 came up for it’s first three year review
in the Spring of 2010. The City Manager required methods to determine if
the Special Service Area had fulfilled it’s goal of maintaining an
economically vibrant downtown. He decided that a study of the location
units used for retail, services, office, and vacant units would supply
the required information

The first part of the project was joint field survey conducted by
Engineering and Community Development to determine the first floor uses
of each building within the Special Service Area. They walked the
entirety of the Special Service Area and record the use of each
commercial unit. The survey results were entered into an Excel
spreadsheet and given to the GIS Office.

The GIS office reviewed the survey and quickly realized that many
buildings have multiple businesses associated with them. Therefore, it
was decide to split the buildings into appropriate units and assign the
business information to each unit. These units were categorized by
commercial use to create three final products, Retail Map, Service and
Office Map. The Director of Community Development reviewed the maps and
then GIS Office submitted to the City Manger.

By using GIS, the city was able to create maps that showed specific
economic activity within the Special Service Area. For example, clusters
of vacant and retail-orientated business were found on the maps. These
maps are helping the City Manager to make the case that the Special
Service Area is successful in maintaining the economic vitality of the
Central Business District.