Analyzing green space using GIS

​The Village of Norridge requires that every residential property
within the Village limits to have at least 65% green space on the
property. This means that the homeowner can only have 35% of the
property consist of impervious surface areas such as the building,
garage, driveway, and patios. Any resident in violation of this policy
can face fines and may be forced to make changes to their property. In
the past, the Village would calculate the green space percentage by
measuring the area of the parcels and the features using a ruler and a
pencil. The Village asked the GIS department to come up with something
that would aid in their analysis.

A map was created showing the percentage of green space for each
parcel in the community. The percentage was calculated by combining all
the building foot prints, driveways, garages, and sidewalks into one
feature then dividing the area of impervious surface in a parcel by the
area of the parcel itself. Even though the number is not necessarily
exact due to some of the features, like patios, not being collected in
the data, it provides a good starting point for any calculations and
allows the village to see what properties may be in violation of the
ordinance and then act accordingly. By using GIS, the village is able to
cut down the amount of time calculating the green space area by hand
and find properties that may be in violation that they might not have
had a reason to check in the past.

Analyzing green space using GIS

​The Village of Norridge requires that every residential property
within the Village limits to have at least 65% green space on the
property. This means that the homeowner can only have 35% of the
property consist of impervious surface areas such as the building,
garage, driveway, and patios. Any resident in violation of this policy
can face fines and may be forced to make changes to their property. In
the past, the Village would calculate the green space percentage by
measuring the area of the parcels and the features using a ruler and a
pencil. The Village asked the GIS department to come up with something
that would aid in their analysis.

A map was created showing the percentage of green space for each
parcel in the community. The percentage was calculated by combining all
the building foot prints, driveways, garages, and sidewalks into one
feature then dividing the area of impervious surface in a parcel by the
area of the parcel itself. Even though the number is not necessarily
exact due to some of the features, like patios, not being collected in
the data, it provides a good starting point for any calculations and
allows the village to see what properties may be in violation of the
ordinance and then act accordingly. By using GIS, the village is able to
cut down the amount of time calculating the green space area by hand
and find properties that may be in violation that they might not have
had a reason to check in the past.

Telling the public about road construction projects

Blog_Telling_the_public_about_road_construction_projects.png

Springtime in the Chicago land area in some cases can mean more noise
from construction then the sounds of birds chirping. And although the
nice weather at this time of year allows for field crews to work with
little disruption, local residents would often disagree that they are
not disturbed. When streets are suddenly closed or traffic begins to
build, residents of a community can certainly become irritated and thus
complain to the community staff. Even though it is impossible to stop
these complaints completely, a community can do their best to notify the
residents where and when these big construction projects will be
occurring, this is exactly what the Village of Morton Grove did.

With help from the Geographic Information System (GIS) Department,
Morton Grove was able to create a construction location map detailing
where all of the major projects were happening in town. In addition, the
Village Engineer wrote a brief description detailing the scope of each
project that was to be included as a legend to the map. Each description
in the legend referred to a number on the map allowing a reader to
gather information about any of the projects that were occurring. As an
end product this map and the legend were then published in the spring
newsletter and eventually mailed to all of the village residents.

Considering it is impossible to satisfy everyone all the time, you
still have to make the proper efforts to at least try. In this specific
case it is easy that publishing a simple map with a legend can allow the
Village of Morton Grove to continue providing an important service of
public announcements.

Telling the public about road construction projects

Blog_Telling_the_public_about_road_construction_projects.png

Springtime in the Chicago land area in some cases can mean more noise
from construction then the sounds of birds chirping. And although the
nice weather at this time of year allows for field crews to work with
little disruption, local residents would often disagree that they are
not disturbed. When streets are suddenly closed or traffic begins to
build, residents of a community can certainly become irritated and thus
complain to the community staff. Even though it is impossible to stop
these complaints completely, a community can do their best to notify the
residents where and when these big construction projects will be
occurring, this is exactly what the Village of Morton Grove did.

With help from the Geographic Information System (GIS) Department,
Morton Grove was able to create a construction location map detailing
where all of the major projects were happening in town. In addition, the
Village Engineer wrote a brief description detailing the scope of each
project that was to be included as a legend to the map. Each description
in the legend referred to a number on the map allowing a reader to
gather information about any of the projects that were occurring. As an
end product this map and the legend were then published in the spring
newsletter and eventually mailed to all of the village residents.

Considering it is impossible to satisfy everyone all the time, you
still have to make the proper efforts to at least try. In this specific
case it is easy that publishing a simple map with a legend can allow the
Village of Morton Grove to continue providing an important service of
public announcements.

Quickly Identifying Vacant Lots

Blog_Quickly_Identifying_Vacant_Lots.jpg

Every year the City of Park Ridge contracts with a photogrammetric
firm in order to collect important planimteric data such as buildings,
driveways, sidewalks, etc. in a computer usable digital format. This
data is fundamentally important as it provides a backbone for a
Geographic Information System (GIS) and allows for in-depth analysis
that can help a city understand the scope of what lies within their city
limits. Whether it is counting how many homes are within a floodplain
or estimating how many sidewalk squares a community must review each
year, this planimetric data has its use. For without it, local
governments would have to resort to alternative methods such as
laborious field checks or manual counts in a Sidwell parcel map atlas.

One of the more recent uses of this planimetric data was Park Ridge’s
task to identify all vacant lots within the city in order to help the
Community and Preservation Development (CP&D) Department locate
these lots for condition monitoring as well as coordinating their
records with Maine township. Normally a task of this magnitude would
require the CP&D Department to rely on historical knowledge of these
lots or to manually drive the entire community documenting what they
find. But now with the use of building footprint data acquired in the
past five years, the GIS can easily flag all parcels that do not have a
building footprint. Additionally, GIS can use high resolution aerial
photography in order to review all parcels that were flagged from the
initial review in an effort to reduce the amount of field checks that
may still be needed.

In conclusion, although it may seem like a costly investment for a
city to acquire planimteric data, its uses in the long run will outweigh
the amount of time and money spent to accomplish the same tasks using
more conventional methods.

Quickly Identifying Vacant Lots

Blog_Quickly_Identifying_Vacant_Lots.jpg

Every year the City of Park Ridge contracts with a photogrammetric
firm in order to collect important planimteric data such as buildings,
driveways, sidewalks, etc. in a computer usable digital format. This
data is fundamentally important as it provides a backbone for a
Geographic Information System (GIS) and allows for in-depth analysis
that can help a city understand the scope of what lies within their city
limits. Whether it is counting how many homes are within a floodplain
or estimating how many sidewalk squares a community must review each
year, this planimetric data has its use. For without it, local
governments would have to resort to alternative methods such as
laborious field checks or manual counts in a Sidwell parcel map atlas.

One of the more recent uses of this planimetric data was Park Ridge’s
task to identify all vacant lots within the city in order to help the
Community and Preservation Development (CP&D) Department locate
these lots for condition monitoring as well as coordinating their
records with Maine township. Normally a task of this magnitude would
require the CP&D Department to rely on historical knowledge of these
lots or to manually drive the entire community documenting what they
find. But now with the use of building footprint data acquired in the
past five years, the GIS can easily flag all parcels that do not have a
building footprint. Additionally, GIS can use high resolution aerial
photography in order to review all parcels that were flagged from the
initial review in an effort to reduce the amount of field checks that
may still be needed.

In conclusion, although it may seem like a costly investment for a
city to acquire planimteric data, its uses in the long run will outweigh
the amount of time and money spent to accomplish the same tasks using
more conventional methods.

Using GIS to Aid in Emergency Dispatching

Blog_Using_GIS_to_Aid_in_Emergency_Dispatching.png

As a new member of the GIS Consortium, the top priority in Lake
Forest has been getting data ready for New World. New World used in some
of the other Consortium communities, is a CAD software that uses GIS to
map out the location of where calls are coming from.

Lake Forest is responsible for dispatching calls for both Police and
Fire for the city, as well as the surrounding communities of Highwood
for Police and Lake Bluff and Knollwood for Fire. Since there were many
detailed paper maps on hand, having this data available at the
dispatchers’ fingertips will greatly improve efficiency and response
time. There will also be a version of New World running on Toughbook
laptops that will be in the emergency vehicles to assist in giving
address locations.

Much of the data being used for this implementation was updated and
standardized before it was ready to be loaded onto the test server. Once
the data is running live, edits will be carried out by Specialists and
can be loaded into the active map to keep updates being entered as soon
as they come in.

In preparing the data for the New World project, we now have many of
the key layers needed for the GISC data conversion out of the way, and
this will aid in our progress of delivering MapOffice™ to Lake Forest
employees as soon as possible.

Using GIS to Aid in Emergency Dispatching

Blog_Using_GIS_to_Aid_in_Emergency_Dispatching.png

As a new member of the GIS Consortium, the top priority in Lake
Forest has been getting data ready for New World. New World used in some
of the other Consortium communities, is a CAD software that uses GIS to
map out the location of where calls are coming from.

Lake Forest is responsible for dispatching calls for both Police and
Fire for the city, as well as the surrounding communities of Highwood
for Police and Lake Bluff and Knollwood for Fire. Since there were many
detailed paper maps on hand, having this data available at the
dispatchers’ fingertips will greatly improve efficiency and response
time. There will also be a version of New World running on Toughbook
laptops that will be in the emergency vehicles to assist in giving
address locations.

Much of the data being used for this implementation was updated and
standardized before it was ready to be loaded onto the test server. Once
the data is running live, edits will be carried out by Specialists and
can be loaded into the active map to keep updates being entered as soon
as they come in.

In preparing the data for the New World project, we now have many of
the key layers needed for the GISC data conversion out of the way, and
this will aid in our progress of delivering MapOffice™ to Lake Forest
employees as soon as possible.

Building a road inventory

Blog_Building_a_road_inventory.png

A recent development in the Riverside Geographic Information System
(GIS) has been the creation of a street inventory. Information captured
includes the type of surface material, road base material, cross section
type, curb and gutter information, last improved dates, planned
improvement dates, and other statistics that can be derived from the GIS
such as the length of roadway and even surface area could be calculated
quickly.

The street inventory is available to all staff at any time through
the Server technology that the village has invested in as well as
through the GIS. This data will provide an excellent resource for
obtaining improvement estimates and to plan resurface programs in the
long term.

Building a road inventory

Blog_Building_a_road_inventory.png

A recent development in the Riverside Geographic Information System
(GIS) has been the creation of a street inventory. Information captured
includes the type of surface material, road base material, cross section
type, curb and gutter information, last improved dates, planned
improvement dates, and other statistics that can be derived from the GIS
such as the length of roadway and even surface area could be calculated
quickly.

The street inventory is available to all staff at any time through
the Server technology that the village has invested in as well as
through the GIS. This data will provide an excellent resource for
obtaining improvement estimates and to plan resurface programs in the
long term.