Web Mapping Deployed in Tinley Park

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Two months after joining the GIS Consortium (GISC), Tinley Park has
deployed MapOffice™ to its citizens and internal staff. MapOffice™
places important local government information on the internet making it
accessible to the public. It also empowers internal staff by making a
wide variety of GIS information available on demand at all of the
Village’s workstations.

MapOffice™ is designed with local government in mind. It
organizes GIS data into tools and tasks that support typical business
processes. The public version makes accurate information easily
accessible, which translates to cost efficiency by reducing phone calls
to department staff for routine information. In turn, this frees up
staff resources to answer more complex questions. In addition to this,
the internal version has advanced functionality that provides an easy
way to view sensitive utility and public safety data.

Tinley Park joins the GIS Consortium

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We are pleased to announce that the Village of Tinley Park has joined
the GIS Consortium. The Village becomes the 18th member of the
Consortium and our first in the Chicago South Suburbs. We would like to
welcome Tinley Park to the GIS Consortium and look forward to an
exciting and collaborative partnership.

GIS response to 2011 storm events

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On June 21st, a powerful storm with wind gusts as high as 81 mph
swept through Chicago and its surrounding suburbs. The severe weather
prompted tornado warnings, stopped air and train travel, and caused
extensive tree damage along with widespread power outages. Commonwealth
Edison (ComEd) estimated that almost a quarter of a million customers
lost power. Another equally violent storm struck the area again on July
11th. The severe winds and heavy rains left more than 700,000 ComEd
customers without power. GIS played a large role in the response to
these events. Here are several examples from GISC member communities:

  • Village of Elk Grove Village: Tree collection zones were displayed
    in MapOffice™ Advanced to assist in the coordination of tree, limb and
    leaf pickup and disposal.
  • Village of Morton Grove: Downed trees were photographed and
    inventoried to get a big picture of how the storms affected the Village.
  • City of Des Plaines: A series of maps was created to show blocked
    streets, downed traffic signals and power lines, and damaged properties.
    Large, wall-sized versions of these maps were printed and hung in the
    Emergency Operations Center to be used during status meetings that
    occurred throughout the day with all the City department heads. Smaller
    versions of these maps were created and placed on the internal network
    for reference. These smaller maps will also be included in an
    after-action report being compiled by the Emergency Management Agency to
    help illustrate the storm response actions taken by each department.
  • Village of Winnetka: The Village maintains its own electric system,
    so existing electric circuit maps were used by village crews and
    provided to crews from other municipalities to assist with reporting
    power outages. According to the Director of the Water and Electric
    Department, the circuit maps were invaluable to the success of the crews
    restoring power as quickly as they did. This was especially true for
    the crews that were unfamiliar with Village streets and electric circuit
    alignments.

GIS data, mapping and staff are critical to every phase of emergency
management, from mitigation and preparedness to response and recovery
efforts. Contact your local GIS Specialist to assure that your community
is fully leveraging its GIS when unexpected events occur.

GIS response to 2011 storm events

Blog_GISresponseto2011stormevents.jpg

On June 21st, a powerful storm with wind gusts as high as 81 mph
swept through Chicago and its surrounding suburbs. The severe weather
prompted tornado warnings, stopped air and train travel, and caused
extensive tree damage along with widespread power outages. Commonwealth
Edison (ComEd) estimated that almost a quarter of a million customers
lost power. Another equally violent storm struck the area again on July
11th. The severe winds and heavy rains left more than 700,000 ComEd
customers without power. GIS played a large role in the response to
these events. Here are several examples from GISC member communities:

  • Village of Elk Grove Village: Tree collection zones were displayed
    in MapOffice™ Advanced to assist in the coordination of tree, limb and
    leaf pickup and disposal.
  • Village of Morton Grove: Downed trees were photographed and
    inventoried to get a big picture of how the storms affected the Village.
  • City of Des Plaines: A series of maps was created to show blocked
    streets, downed traffic signals and power lines, and damaged properties.
    Large, wall-sized versions of these maps were printed and hung in the
    Emergency Operations Center to be used during status meetings that
    occurred throughout the day with all the City department heads. Smaller
    versions of these maps were created and placed on the internal network
    for reference. These smaller maps will also be included in an
    after-action report being compiled by the Emergency Management Agency to
    help illustrate the storm response actions taken by each department.
  • Village of Winnetka: The Village maintains its own electric system,
    so existing electric circuit maps were used by village crews and
    provided to crews from other municipalities to assist with reporting
    power outages. According to the Director of the Water and Electric
    Department, the circuit maps were invaluable to the success of the crews
    restoring power as quickly as they did. This was especially true for
    the crews that were unfamiliar with Village streets and electric circuit
    alignments.

GIS data, mapping and staff are critical to every phase of emergency
management, from mitigation and preparedness to response and recovery
efforts. Contact your local GIS Specialist to assure that your community
is fully leveraging its GIS when unexpected events occur.

Increasing use of wireless GIS by GISC Fire Departments

​Last year the GIS Consoritum (GISC) conducted a survey of the member
Fire Departments. Among the topics was the use of wireless in the field
along with the type of records management systems used. The goal was to
set the vision for future MapOffice™ Advanced development to assure its
continued support of Public Safety. The results from the survey
reinforce the notion that more and more local governments are turning to
technology to improve the efficiency of business processes. More than
half (63%) of Fire Departments covering GISC communities have wireless
in the field right now with an additional 3 communities providing
wireless in the field within the next two years. That said by 2013, 80%
of GISC members will have access to MapOffice™ Advanced in the field to
use for emergency response.

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As a result of the survey the GISC will be researching:

  • Providing Mobile Data Viewer (MDV™) functionality in MapOffice™ Advanced
    • Within two (2) years, more than 80% of departments will be supporting wireless in the field
  • Integrating Firehouse in MapOffice™ Advanced
    • Since Firehouse™ is the predominately used software (75%) for
      pre-plan and records management, integration with MapOffice™ Advanced is
      critical.
  • Establishing MapOffice™ Advanced functionality if wireless
    connection is not available/down Based on the consortium-wide push
    towards wireless, having a backup version of MapOffice™ Advanced
    available when wireless is down will be essential.

The GISC appreciates the time that the Fire Departments took out of their busy schedules to answer this survey.

Increasing use of wireless GIS by GISC Fire Departments

​Last year the GIS Consoritum (GISC) conducted a survey of the member
Fire Departments. Among the topics was the use of wireless in the field
along with the type of records management systems used. The goal was to
set the vision for future MapOffice™ Advanced development to assure its
continued support of Public Safety. The results from the survey
reinforce the notion that more and more local governments are turning to
technology to improve the efficiency of business processes. More than
half (63%) of Fire Departments covering GISC communities have wireless
in the field right now with an additional 3 communities providing
wireless in the field within the next two years. That said by 2013, 80%
of GISC members will have access to MapOffice™ Advanced in the field to
use for emergency response.

Blog_IncreasinguseofwirelessGISbyGISCFireDepartments.png

As a result of the survey the GISC will be researching:

  • Providing Mobile Data Viewer (MDV™) functionality in MapOffice™ Advanced
    • Within two (2) years, more than 80% of departments will be supporting wireless in the field
  • Integrating Firehouse in MapOffice™ Advanced
    • Since Firehouse™ is the predominately used software (75%) for
      pre-plan and records management, integration with MapOffice™ Advanced is
      critical.
  • Establishing MapOffice™ Advanced functionality if wireless
    connection is not available/down Based on the consortium-wide push
    towards wireless, having a backup version of MapOffice™ Advanced
    available when wireless is down will be essential.

The GISC appreciates the time that the Fire Departments took out of their busy schedules to answer this survey.

GIS Consortium in GeoSpatial Today

​GIS Specialists Erik Voight, Jason Sphar and Mike Falkofske of MGP
Inc. along with former City of Des Plaines Economic Development
Coordinator Jennifer Ganser recently published an article regarding
local government and information transparency in the February 2011
edition.

Erik and Jennifer outlined the benefits of providing business vacancy
information in Google Maps. The authors find that providing this
information has reduced the time business space stays vacant and
ultimately increases economic revenues back to the City. Jason and Mike
describe the benefits of providing parking information on local
government websites for Park Ridge and Highland Park. Making parking
information available on the web provides information that demystifies
local parking ordinances and restrictions which encourages citizens to
take of downtown urban spaces.

The content of this article was presented at the Fall Illinois GIS
Association (ILGISA) conference and Wisconsin Land Information
Association (WLIA) annual conference. GeoSpatial is a publication for
GIS practitioners with a circulation of approximately 10,000, primarily
in North America, Europe and Asia Pacific.

The article can be found at: http://emag.geospatialtoday.com

Sewer/sanitary tracing in MapOffice

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In June of this year it was requested by a Public Works Director that
MapOffice™ Advanced provide the functionality to trace up and downstream
flow of sewer and sanitary utility lines. The user identified that they
would like to be able to click on a point and see all of the storm
sewers that are tributary to that point. This month the "Sewer Tracing"
task was added. This provides the ability of a community user to click
on a utility line that is either part of the combined, sewer or storm
system and trace it up or downstream with a single click. Along with
visually seeing where the utility line flows there are two tables
displaying information related to your query. The first is a table
showing some high level summary information and the second details all
the infrastructure from the affected pipe. This task puts a complex GIS
process behind a single click of a mouse for local government users.

Sewer/sanitary tracing in MapOffice

Blog_SewersanitarytracinginMapOffice.png

In June of this year it was requested by a Public Works Director that
MapOffice™ Advanced provide the functionality to trace up and downstream
flow of sewer and sanitary utility lines. The user identified that they
would like to be able to click on a point and see all of the storm
sewers that are tributary to that point. This month the "Sewer Tracing"
task was added. This provides the ability of a community user to click
on a utility line that is either part of the combined, sewer or storm
system and trace it up or downstream with a single click. Along with
visually seeing where the utility line flows there are two tables
displaying information related to your query. The first is a table
showing some high level summary information and the second details all
the infrastructure from the affected pipe. This task puts a complex GIS
process behind a single click of a mouse for local government users.

Business intelligence for MapOffice

Blog_Busin'essintelligenceforMapOffice.pngThe GIS Consortium (GISC) Information Technology Technical committee met
this week to review and discuss the upcoming business intelligence
functionality for MapOffice™ Advanced. For years the GIS Consortium has
been working to provide authoritative community data on demand in a
spatial context. Until now the mapping of community enterprise data
relied on Specialists to geocode. Last year Tom Thomey, MGP Inc
Executive laid out the vision to be able to map real-time community data
in MapOffice™ Advanced at the 2009 GISC Annual Board of Directors
meeting. With the roll out of business intelligence this month this has
become a reality. Business intelligence allows community staffs to
interact with a wide variety of data from their community enterprise
systems. Users have the ability to create custom on demand requests.
These queries or searches can be saved and run daily. With business
intelligence community IT departments are able to setup this service
securely in MapOffice™ to give staffs the ability to spatially analyze
their enterprise system data like permits, business licenses and crime
incidences on demand. In summary business intelligence, leverages the
community’s GIS investment, provides information on demand and improves
efficiency.