Business intelligence for MapOffice

Blog_Busin'essintelligenceforMapOffice.pngThe GIS Consortium (GISC) Information Technology Technical committee met
this week to review and discuss the upcoming business intelligence
functionality for MapOffice™ Advanced. For years the GIS Consortium has
been working to provide authoritative community data on demand in a
spatial context. Until now the mapping of community enterprise data
relied on Specialists to geocode. Last year Tom Thomey, MGP Inc
Executive laid out the vision to be able to map real-time community data
in MapOffice™ Advanced at the 2009 GISC Annual Board of Directors
meeting. With the roll out of business intelligence this month this has
become a reality. Business intelligence allows community staffs to
interact with a wide variety of data from their community enterprise
systems. Users have the ability to create custom on demand requests.
These queries or searches can be saved and run daily. With business
intelligence community IT departments are able to setup this service
securely in MapOffice™ to give staffs the ability to spatially analyze
their enterprise system data like permits, business licenses and crime
incidences on demand. In summary business intelligence, leverages the
community’s GIS investment, provides information on demand and improves
efficiency.

Adding historical imagery into MapOffice

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​In the latest update to MapOffice™ Advanced the ability for community
staff members to bring up historical imagery was added. With 17
communities in all the Consortium has collected a wide variety of aerial
imagery. The aerial imagery for some communities dates back to 1939. In
the example above aerial imagery from 1939 and 2010 is contrasted. GISC
Community members have a wealth of aerial photography information and
now they can easily visualize it by year. This ability allows for staff
members to see historical uses of property. The next step for the
development team is the creation of a slider that will provide
additional functionality and make the comparison of land use over time
easier and more intuitive. Development will continue to add years as
photos become available.

Adding historical imagery into MapOffice

Blog_AddinghistoricalimageryintoMapOffice.png

​In the latest update to MapOffice™ Advanced the ability for community
staff members to bring up historical imagery was added. With 17
communities in all the Consortium has collected a wide variety of aerial
imagery. The aerial imagery for some communities dates back to 1939. In
the example above aerial imagery from 1939 and 2010 is contrasted. GISC
Community members have a wealth of aerial photography information and
now they can easily visualize it by year. This ability allows for staff
members to see historical uses of property. The next step for the
development team is the creation of a slider that will provide
additional functionality and make the comparison of land use over time
easier and more intuitive. Development will continue to add years as
photos become available.

MapOffice tool tutorials

Blog_MapOfficetooltutorials.png

The GIS Consortium (GISC) over the past several months has been
developing online, on demand tutorial videos for MapOffice™ and
MapOffice™ advanced. These videos are found on the GISC website under
the video gallery page (http://www.gisconsortium.org/gallery/video/) and
available to anyone.

The stated purpose of these videos is to expose the public, decision
makers and municipal users to the efficiencies that can be achieved
using the MapOffice™ products and tools. To date there is an overview of
MapOffice™ available and four in detail tool tutorials. The next video
tutorial being created is to show the efficiency of looking up utilities
in MapOffice™ Advanced.

MapOffice tool tutorials

Blog_MapOfficetooltutorials.png

The GIS Consortium (GISC) over the past several months has been
developing online, on demand tutorial videos for MapOffice™ and
MapOffice™ advanced. These videos are found on the GISC website under
the video gallery page (http://www.gisconsortium.org/gallery/video/) and
available to anyone.

The stated purpose of these videos is to expose the public, decision
makers and municipal users to the efficiencies that can be achieved
using the MapOffice™ products and tools. To date there is an overview of
MapOffice™ available and four in detail tool tutorials. The next video
tutorial being created is to show the efficiency of looking up utilities
in MapOffice™ Advanced.

Monitoring flood levels in MapOffice

Blog_Monitoring_flood_levels_in_MapOffice.png

Last week the GIS Consortium released the ability to display National
Weather Service Advanced Hydrological Prediction Service data for the
region. With a series of clicks real time flooding information can be
displayed in MapOffice™ Advanced for use by decision makers.

Flood Hazard Mapping is an important component for emergency response
in flood-prone areas. Adding flood gauges to MapOffice™ creates an
easily-read, rapidly-accessible charts and maps which facilitates the
administrators and planners to identify areas of risk and prioritize
their mitigation/response efforts. The results were evident when
according to Terrence O’Brien, president of the Metropolitan Water
Reclamation District (MWRD), said that Cook County received an average
rainfall of 4 1/2 inches, "equivalent to over 60 billion gallons of
water." With some areas getting as much as 7 inches on July 23rd.

The water level for the gauge in Riverside is shown above and
illustrates the impact of the event. Going into flooding season this
functionality should streamline flood mitigation planning and response
for local governments.

Monitoring flood levels in MapOffice

Blog_Monitoring_flood_levels_in_MapOffice.png

Last week the GIS Consortium released the ability to display National
Weather Service Advanced Hydrological Prediction Service data for the
region. With a series of clicks real time flooding information can be
displayed in MapOffice™ Advanced for use by decision makers.

Flood Hazard Mapping is an important component for emergency response
in flood-prone areas. Adding flood gauges to MapOffice™ creates an
easily-read, rapidly-accessible charts and maps which facilitates the
administrators and planners to identify areas of risk and prioritize
their mitigation/response efforts. The results were evident when
according to Terrence O’Brien, president of the Metropolitan Water
Reclamation District (MWRD), said that Cook County received an average
rainfall of 4 1/2 inches, "equivalent to over 60 billion gallons of
water." With some areas getting as much as 7 inches on July 23rd.

The water level for the gauge in Riverside is shown above and
illustrates the impact of the event. Going into flooding season this
functionality should streamline flood mitigation planning and response
for local governments.

GISC presenting at the ICMA 2010 Annual Conference

​Bob Irvin, Village Manager of Lincolnshire and I will be presenting
as apart of the educational series at the International City Managers
Association (ICMA) 2010 annual conference on October 17-20th.

The intent of the session is to offer an in-depth look at how a small
group of local governments in the Chicago metropolitan area created a
geographic information system (GIS) consortium. Panelists will highlight
the benefits of sharing resources and outline how they worked together
to develop a comprehensive GIS service. Attendees will learn about the
consortium development process and governance, as well as the uses and
benefits of GIS.

GISC presenting at the ICMA 2010 Annual Conference

​Bob Irvin, Village Manager of Lincolnshire and I will be presenting
as apart of the educational series at the International City Managers
Association (ICMA) 2010 annual conference on October 17-20th.

The intent of the session is to offer an in-depth look at how a small
group of local governments in the Chicago metropolitan area created a
geographic information system (GIS) consortium. Panelists will highlight
the benefits of sharing resources and outline how they worked together
to develop a comprehensive GIS service. Attendees will learn about the
consortium development process and governance, as well as the uses and
benefits of GIS.

Separating tasks and tools in MapOffice

Separating_tasks_and_tools_in_MapOffice.png

The organization of MapOffice™ you may have noticed has changed
slightly. What was once just tools has been separated into two
categories. Tools and tasks are now available at differing levels of
functionality depending on the version of MapOffice™ you are using.Tool
and tasks have been separated as a result of feedback from the user
community.

Many local government users wanted the ability to measure and conduct
other tool type functions with executing their business
processes/tasks. The two were separated and definitions for each
created.Tasks are focused on work completed by local government. These
are functions that occur every day in local government and the addition
of GIS makes them more efficient. An example of a task is isolating a
water main using the water main isolation task. These differ from tools
in that tools work independently of tasks and basemaps. Tools are
traditional technical functions of GIS like measure and identify.
Examples of tools are measure distance, measure area, identify and
markup. These can be used regardless of what view is being used or task
is being completed.