Feedback ability introduced for MapOffice Advanced

Blog_Feedback_ability_introduced_for_MapOffice_Advanced.png

Community users of MapOffice™ Advanced may have noticed a new "Feedback"
button now available in the upper left corner of the toolbar. The GIS
Consortium (GISC) has released the ability for users at the community
level to provide feedback directly and instantly to GIS staff through
the MapOffice™ interface. Users are now able to give feedback and
provide markups to GIS staff for a range of changes. Examples include a
change in address, updating of a pipe size or the relocation of a water
main. Community staff in the field have the ability to send
modifications and improvements directly to GIS staff. Their input and
knowledge is then reflected in the GIS updates. Community staff feedback
enhances the quality of GIS data used by GISC members. Their submitted
feedback is reviewed by GIS staff and once the change is made an email
is sent to the requestor to notify them that the data has been updated.​

Feedback ability introduced for MapOffice Advanced

Blog_Feedback_ability_introduced_for_MapOffice_Advanced.png

Community users of MapOffice™ Advanced may have noticed a new "Feedback"
button now available in the upper left corner of the toolbar. The GIS
Consortium (GISC) has released the ability for users at the community
level to provide feedback directly and instantly to GIS staff through
the MapOffice™ interface. Users are now able to give feedback and
provide markups to GIS staff for a range of changes. Examples include a
change in address, updating of a pipe size or the relocation of a water
main. Community staff in the field have the ability to send
modifications and improvements directly to GIS staff. Their input and
knowledge is then reflected in the GIS updates. Community staff feedback
enhances the quality of GIS data used by GISC members. Their submitted
feedback is reviewed by GIS staff and once the change is made an email
is sent to the requestor to notify them that the data has been updated.​

GISC honored with the 2010 GITA Excellence award

​The GIS Consortium (GISC) has been awarded the Geospatial Information
and Technology Association (GITA) Excellence Award for 2010. The
organization is one of the oldest in the GIS industry started back in
the late 1960’s. The GITA’s Excellence Award is an overall industry
award that recognizes a user organization for its outstanding
application of geospatial technology. Candidates for the Excellence
Award demonstrate dedication, insight and a high degree of initiative in
implementing, managing and expanding multifaceted geospatial systems
incorporating multiple applications that reach across their
organization.

In November the GISC submitted a six page application outlining the
GISC model. The article outlined GISC’s leadership and insight in the
GIS industry along with the dedication of the Board. The article
highlighted the business accomplishments of the GISC and the benefits
attained by the GISC member communities. Past recipients of the
Excellence Award are XCel Energy in Minneapolis, Duke Power Company
Charlotte, and Telefonica in Sao Paulo.

GISC honored with the 2010 GITA Excellence award

​The GIS Consortium (GISC) has been awarded the Geospatial Information
and Technology Association (GITA) Excellence Award for 2010. The
organization is one of the oldest in the GIS industry started back in
the late 1960’s. The GITA’s Excellence Award is an overall industry
award that recognizes a user organization for its outstanding
application of geospatial technology. Candidates for the Excellence
Award demonstrate dedication, insight and a high degree of initiative in
implementing, managing and expanding multifaceted geospatial systems
incorporating multiple applications that reach across their
organization.

In November the GISC submitted a six page application outlining the
GISC model. The article outlined GISC’s leadership and insight in the
GIS industry along with the dedication of the Board. The article
highlighted the business accomplishments of the GISC and the benefits
attained by the GISC member communities. Past recipients of the
Excellence Award are XCel Energy in Minneapolis, Duke Power Company
Charlotte, and Telefonica in Sao Paulo.

Second edition of GIS local government cost savings released

​In 2008 the GISC published the document, "Valuing Geographic
Information System (GIS) A Decision Maker’s Perspective" which analyzed
GIS from a cost savings perspective. That is, what cost savings can
accrue to an organization with a GIS program? Cost savings is derived by
comparing business process efficiency in an organization with (and
without) a GIS program. The estimates provided use conservative
assumptions. The results represent a reasonable and supportable basis
for demonstrating cost savings with GIS. The first edition of this
document outlined eight general areas where the introduction of a GIS
could save communities money and improve efficiency. In the second
edition outlines two additional areas for communities to save with the
implementation of a GIS.

The second edition comes to the same conclusion as the first edition,
that GIS saves money, the amount varies by organization. This paper
illustrates that cost savings is directly proportional to the
utilization of the program. The more the system is used the more value
it generates. For this to occur there needs to be a top-down incentive
to utilize the system. This includes maintaining a reliable system and
providing the necessary resources and training to support that system.
In addition to supporting traditional local government processes in a
more efficient automated format, GIS can generate significant cost
savings and value to the organization. The second edition estimates that
GIS can save a small community $67,858 dollars annually and a large
community $274,758 dollars annually.

Second edition of GIS local government cost savings released

​In 2008 the GISC published the document, "Valuing Geographic
Information System (GIS) A Decision Maker’s Perspective" which analyzed
GIS from a cost savings perspective. That is, what cost savings can
accrue to an organization with a GIS program? Cost savings is derived by
comparing business process efficiency in an organization with (and
without) a GIS program. The estimates provided use conservative
assumptions. The results represent a reasonable and supportable basis
for demonstrating cost savings with GIS. The first edition of this
document outlined eight general areas where the introduction of a GIS
could save communities money and improve efficiency. In the second
edition outlines two additional areas for communities to save with the
implementation of a GIS.

The second edition comes to the same conclusion as the first edition,
that GIS saves money, the amount varies by organization. This paper
illustrates that cost savings is directly proportional to the
utilization of the program. The more the system is used the more value
it generates. For this to occur there needs to be a top-down incentive
to utilize the system. This includes maintaining a reliable system and
providing the necessary resources and training to support that system.
In addition to supporting traditional local government processes in a
more efficient automated format, GIS can generate significant cost
savings and value to the organization. The second edition estimates that
GIS can save a small community $67,858 dollars annually and a large
community $274,758 dollars annually.

Annual Board of Directors meeting

​In conjunction with the Annual Board of Directors meeting on November
6th MGP has authored the "2009 Annual Board of Directors Report." The
document outlines the cost savings of the GISC model. The mission of the
GIS Consortium (GISC) is to create value for its members by identifying
opportunities to minimize cost and risk through collaboration.

A decade of success would typically be a time to celebrate, however
it comes at a time of considerable economic distress. It does remind us
however of the relevance of this model. This year (2009) was a year of
reflection and refocusing of the objectives of the GIS Consortium. In
March of this year, the Board conducted a special meeting to evaluate
all aspects of the GIS Consortium. This four-hour session generated a
number of initiatives present in this report. These include greater
flexibility for existing members, an independent software audit to
identify opportunities for more efficient licensing, and increased
attention to cooperative opportunities with other regional GIS
organizations.

Mapping (GIS) is a core competency of local government. We depend on
it to deliver services, manage infrastructure, and regulate property. As
technology evolves, advanced mapping solutions play a critical role in
managing our communities. They help us make better decisions, operate
our organizations more efficiently, and communicate information more
effectively. This year the GISC published the second-edition of ‘Valuing
Geographic Information System (GIS) – A Decision Maker’s Perspective’.
This new publication revisits the assumptions of the first-edition and
adds new business processes that benefit from GIS technology. The
results indicate that local government can save considerable resources
with a well implement GIS program. This document does not include the
savings provided by the GIS Consortium model.

In the beginning there were skeptics of the GISC model – today few
detractors remain. The model has demonstrated its ability to provide
sophisticated solutions at a fraction of the cost of internally-staffed
or single-payer/vendor outsourcing programs. It does this by creating
purchasing power for its members through economies-of-scale. Today the
GISC provides much more including shared product development, community
networking opportunities, and standard processes.

Last year (2008) marked the single largest membership growth period
for the GISC – it was projected that 2009 would be similar. This
forecast however was impacted by the current economic environment. Even
with the downturn the GISC maintained all its existing members and has
never lost a member in its history. The GISC has traditionally focused
its message to prospects on the cost-savings provided by the consortium
model. Although this remains an important component, perhaps more
important is the efficiency GIS provides local government. The
technology benefit coupled with the GISC approach is a compelling case
study for new membership development.

The GISC is recognized as a strategic partner in the greater-Chicago
regional GIS industry. Organizations that share our values of efficiency
and cooperation are seeking our advice. This could not come at a better
time, as we all face new challenges in these economic times. The GISC
stands as a symbol of what the future may look like in local government.

Annual Board of Directors meeting

​In conjunction with the Annual Board of Directors meeting on November
6th MGP has authored the "2009 Annual Board of Directors Report." The
document outlines the cost savings of the GISC model. The mission of the
GIS Consortium (GISC) is to create value for its members by identifying
opportunities to minimize cost and risk through collaboration.

A decade of success would typically be a time to celebrate, however
it comes at a time of considerable economic distress. It does remind us
however of the relevance of this model. This year (2009) was a year of
reflection and refocusing of the objectives of the GIS Consortium. In
March of this year, the Board conducted a special meeting to evaluate
all aspects of the GIS Consortium. This four-hour session generated a
number of initiatives present in this report. These include greater
flexibility for existing members, an independent software audit to
identify opportunities for more efficient licensing, and increased
attention to cooperative opportunities with other regional GIS
organizations.

Mapping (GIS) is a core competency of local government. We depend on
it to deliver services, manage infrastructure, and regulate property. As
technology evolves, advanced mapping solutions play a critical role in
managing our communities. They help us make better decisions, operate
our organizations more efficiently, and communicate information more
effectively. This year the GISC published the second-edition of ‘Valuing
Geographic Information System (GIS) – A Decision Maker’s Perspective’.
This new publication revisits the assumptions of the first-edition and
adds new business processes that benefit from GIS technology. The
results indicate that local government can save considerable resources
with a well implement GIS program. This document does not include the
savings provided by the GIS Consortium model.

In the beginning there were skeptics of the GISC model – today few
detractors remain. The model has demonstrated its ability to provide
sophisticated solutions at a fraction of the cost of internally-staffed
or single-payer/vendor outsourcing programs. It does this by creating
purchasing power for its members through economies-of-scale. Today the
GISC provides much more including shared product development, community
networking opportunities, and standard processes.

Last year (2008) marked the single largest membership growth period
for the GISC – it was projected that 2009 would be similar. This
forecast however was impacted by the current economic environment. Even
with the downturn the GISC maintained all its existing members and has
never lost a member in its history. The GISC has traditionally focused
its message to prospects on the cost-savings provided by the consortium
model. Although this remains an important component, perhaps more
important is the efficiency GIS provides local government. The
technology benefit coupled with the GISC approach is a compelling case
study for new membership development.

The GISC is recognized as a strategic partner in the greater-Chicago
regional GIS industry. Organizations that share our values of efficiency
and cooperation are seeking our advice. This could not come at a better
time, as we all face new challenges in these economic times. The GISC
stands as a symbol of what the future may look like in local government.

Village of Glenview Police taking advantage of GIS

The use of Geographic Information System (GIS) to understand spatial
patterns of crime and criminal behavior has become more prevalent in
recent years. The recent introduction of GIS and reporting software has
made this type of analysis increasingly easier. Every several months the
Police Department for the Village of Glenview receives updated maps
showing the location and time of residential and automotive burglaries
along with summary statistics. Looking at the addresses spatially allows
for the detectives to put together possible patterns in criminal
behavior.

It is important to note that because the village uses New World
Systems for its dispatch and records keeping software. The GIS and New
World Systems is integrated making mapping quick and efficient. The
software uses the GIS data to show squad cars where an emergency is as
well as logging that emergency into a records database. Using these
records the GIS Department and Police Department add the data to a map
providing a spatial context not always readily apparent when responding
to burglaries. By mapping and cataloging incidences, patrol adjustment
may be modified to ensure that problematic areas are receiving increased
resources (i.e. more patrols, increased frequency of patrols). The
inclusion of graphs and charts also gave other police department staff
personnel such as detectives a historical understanding of where crime
has happened as well whether the burglary was categorized as either
residential and/or automotive.

In the past this type of analysis was done on large village wide maps
with push pins where the data could not be easily shared or emailed.
Now with an integrated records/dispatch system and a proper GIS quick
analysis of historical and current data displayed on a fully
customizable and accurate map becomes much easier.