On the Fast Track to Updating Bikeway Information

The Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP) helps local governments plan land use and transportation initiatives to promote sustainability. CMAP’s GO TO 2040 comprehensive plan is designed to achieve this by providing recommendations on transportation, human capital and governance. One way in which CMAP strives to improve the livability of communities is through their Soles and Spokes Plan which encourages citizens to walk and bike.

The Village of Tinley Park, IL was asked to provide information about their existing walking and biking facilities for integration into CMAP’s Bikeway Information System (BIS). In order to respond to CMAP’s request, the Village had to fill out a questionnaire and mark a map with any changes or updates to the bikeway system. 

After consulting with Geographic Information Systems (GIS), the Village responded to CMAP’s request by structuring bikeway facility data around the questionnaire. Bikeways were drawn using GIS and attributed based on CMAP’s interest in facility type, status, location, and other factors. By relying on GIS, the Village of Tinley Park reduced the time to complete a written response for each bikeway. Data is now stored in a system that is easily accessible and can be queried whenever needed by staff.

Know the Flow: Who Has Residential Sprinklers

During a fire event, a sprinkler system is a key ally in battling the blaze and minimizing the damage. The City of Park Ridge, IL understands this firsthand and requires any new construction be equipped with a fire sprinkler system. While a long-time standard for commercial structures, this now includes residential buildings. 

Sprinkler information was traditionally tracked in a spreadsheet. However, locating a particular address wasn’t an easy or robust process, and not all staff members had direct access. As a result, the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Office was asked to devise a more effective way of delivering this information to staff.

GIS created a MapOffice™ Web Access Business Intelligence connection that references residential sprinkler locations throughout the city. Now when staff want to determine whether or not a residential sprinkler is installed at a home, all they do is type in an address when the connection is on. They can then click a point on the map and the spreadsheet information attributed to that address can be quickly accessed.

This is a great example of how GIS can connect with address-based tabular data and make information immediately accessible to those who need it.

Maintaining Village Property More Efficiently

The Village of Mundelein, IL owns a number of properties that require regular maintenance. This ranges from mowing and fertilizing to plant bed care. Every two years the Village seeks bids from contractors to service these areas. 

In the bid proposal, the Village includes a list of locations with site numbers. Each record in the list includes an address or description of the location and the type of maintenance required. Maps with the location of site numbers are included to make it easier for contractors to find and evaluate sites.

The Public Works Department asked the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Office to assist with this year’s bids by creating maps for each location. Since most sites are small, one requirement was to format maps so that several would fit on one page. Using the Data Driven pages toolbar in Esri’s ArcMap software, the GIS Office set up an atlas with four maps per page. Because map layers are linked to data, they can be quickly updated with new information.

The result is a win-win for the Village and its vendors. By including maps in bid proposals, contractors can accurately bid on maintenance.  And by leveraging the power of GIS, Public Works can automate the creation and updating of maps with greater efficiency.

Building Better Communication Community-Wide

Infrastructure improvements are invaluable in keeping a community running smoothly. Unfortunately, they can turn into annoyances when a road must be closed or a car is trapped in a driveway due to road resurfacing. That is why it’s important for municipalities to communicate effectively with their residents about upcoming and ongoing construction projects.

Traditionally communities created a report with details about ongoing construction. However, this was problematic for new residents, who may not be familiar with the street network, to understand exactly where projects are occurring. While some communities use a PDF map, this can confuse residents who may not easily connect the list of projects to locations on the map.

To get around some of these issues, the Village of Mundelein, IL decided to develop interactive map to display construction locations. Residents can click on the location of a project and immediately see information in a pop-up bubble. Projects are updated each week with their current status. The interactive map is a great tool for the Village to deliver timely information, promote transparency, and minimize inconvenience for the community.

Assigning Feet on the Street for the Sub Beat

How can police analyze the number of crimes that occur and use that information to assign resources effectively? For the Village of Mundelein, IL, the answer was mapping. Because Police Sub Beats are integral to the process of assigning resources, it is important to know how many incidents occur in each. The Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Office recommended mapping incidents on top of Police Sub Beats to see correlations and frequencies at a glance.

The project focused on mapping auto and structural burglaries over the past two years. Locations were overlaid on Police Sub Beats and three maps were created to display data from a variety of viewpoints. One map depicted the location of each incident; a second map showed the number of incidents in each Sub Beat; and a third map displayed the density of burglaries throughout the Village.

Now the Chief of Police can look at the number of incidents per Sub Beat and determine if Sub Beats need to be realigned or if more resources must be assigned. By combining information from dispatch record software and GIS databases, the GIS Office quickly created a trio of maps to help police visualize burglary "hot spots" in the community.